Apr
28
Thu
Pulling Together Series: Teachers and Instructors
Apr 28 @ 2:00 pm – Jun 2 @ 4:00 pm
Pulling Together Series: Teachers and Instructors

Pulling Together: A Guide for Indigenization of Post-Secondary Institutions — Teachers and Instructors is part of a set of open professional learning guides that are the result of collaboration between BCcampus, the Ministry of Advanced Education and Skills Training, and a steering committee of Indigenous education leaders. The content in these guides is authored by teams of Indigenous and ally writers from across B.C.

This series is intended to support systemic change in the Trades Education and Training sectors, although you need not be a Trades instructor to attend. We all have a role to play in strengthening our educational practices to contribute positively toward improving the lives and learners within the Trades community.

This is a multi-day event with one synchronous session each Thursday from 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m., April 28 to June 2.

Facilitators

Priscilla Taipale (she/her) has been a visitor on Coast Salish territory since 2001 and lives and works on the traditional, unceded territory of the xʷməθkwəy̓əm (Musqueam), Skwxwú7mesh (Squamish), and Səl̓ílwətaʔ/Selilwitulh (Tsleil-Waututh) peoples. She is Cree and a member of Taykwa Tagamou Nation in Treaty 9 territory (Northeastern Ontario), and she also has Finnish and English settler ancestry. For the past several years, Priscilla has been working in Indigenous health and cultural safety at Vancouver Coastal Health, the University of British Columbia (UBC), and the British Columbia Institute of Technology (BCIT), where she has facilitated cultural safety training for health authority staff (physicians, nurses, allied health, and administration) and for health science students at UBC. She is currently contract faculty in the BCIT School of Nursing Bachelor of Science in Nursing program. Along with teaching the Indigenous health course, she is also involved in curriculum work focused on Indigenization. Priscilla holds a PhD in nursing from UBC. Her career in healthcare spans over 20 years in clinical care, research, education, and leadership.

Tami Pierce (she/her) is the associate director, Indigenous Initiatives and Partnerships at BCIT, an Indigenous education consultant, and a Simon Fraser University alum. She is of Tsm’syen and Japanese descent and grew up on the northwest coast of B.C. She currently lives and works on the traditional, unceded territory of the Coast Salish Nations, including the homelands of the xʷməθkwəy̓əm (Musqueam), Skwxwú7mesh (Squamish), and Səl̓ílwətaʔ/Selilwitulh (Tsleil-Waututh) peoples.

Tami has over 27 years in the post-secondary system and has held various roles. While administration and management have been her key areas of focus, she also enjoys teaching. Recent highlights of her work include co-writing Indigenous curriculum, facilitating cultural awareness and cultural sensitivity training, teaching office administration, developing and facilitating workshops, and, for fun, writing about her own lived experiences. One of her essays was published in the 2018 edition of The Indigenous Peoples Atlas of Canada, where she shares a heartfelt story about her personal experience with racism.

 

This event is free. To ensure we have an inclusive and welcoming environment for all, we’ve added registration to all our sessions.

Register now!

This notice is to inform you that this session will be recorded, archived, and made available publicly on BCcampus.ca. By participating in this session, you acknowledge that your participation in this session will be recorded and the recording will be made available openly. 

May
19
Thu
Pulling Together Teachers and Instructors Series 2022
May 19 – Jun 23 all-day

The Guide for Teachers and Instructors explores how to Indigenize your practice by building new relationships with Indigenous pedagogy and knowledge. This guide mirrors the structure of curriculum design and pedagogical processes to support learning by focusing on three processes — content, context, and application. Content acts as prior knowledge bridges and explores how we got here today. Context grounds you to recognize, respect, and honour Indigenous worldviews and suggests ways to invite into your classroom and practice. Application encourages movement forward by providing tangible ideas and next steps for Indigenization.

The goals of this six-part webinar include:

  • Learning the importance of Indigenous worldviews and how to incorporate them into your teaching style and practice
  • Assessing your current curriculum and pedagogy and considering them in relation to TRC, UNDRIP, and other Indigenous policies
  • Reviewing ethical and relational protocols within your institutions
  • Locating oneself within the work and what next steps are important to tangible outcomes

Overview

This series requires a commitment of 1.5 hours synchronous learning every Thursday for six weeks and about 30 minutes asynchronous reading and thought outside of class. We strongly advise participants to make time to attend every session in the series. Session dates and times are as follows:

  • Week 1: Thursday, May 19th 10-11:30am PST 
  • Week 2: Thursday, May 26th 10-11:30am PST   
  • Week 3: Thursday, June 2nd 10-11:30am PST 
  • Week 4: Thursday June 9th 10-11:30am PST 
  • Week 5: Thursday June 16th 10-11:30am PST 
  • Week 6: Thursday June 23rd 10-11:30am PST 

The series will be facilitated using a variety of methods. We will host guest speakers that include an Elder, members of academia, and community members. Participants will collaborate with one another in weekly breakout rooms and through interactive apps. Each participant will be mailed their own medicine pouch kit and instructed how to assemble it during one of the synchronous sessions. This communal activity is a unique aspect of the series and provides a way for participants to hold space for themselves and their own self-care during the workshop. We will also be joined by a graphic recorder, who will capture the essence of each session with a succinct visual image that will be shared with participants. Graphic recording is a modern take on the witnessing ceremony, and we are honored to have Michelle with us to witness this community work.

We will cap registrations at 50 participants, so please ensure you register early to attend the entire series.

This event is free. To ensure we have an inclusive and welcoming environment for all, we’ve added registration to all our sessions.

Register now!

Participants can access the guide for free via the BCcampus website or opt to purchase a hardcopy via our OER collection.

Facilitators

Tanya Ball (she/her) is a Michif woman from Winnipeg, Manitoba, in Treaty 1 Territory. She is currently living in Amiskwaciwâskahikan (Edmonton, Alberta), where she is enrolled in the PhD program with the Faculty of Native Studies at the University of Alberta. Here she is working with her family from St. Ambroise to research the connections between Michif storytelling and experience of religion. She is also a sessional instructor at the School of Information Studies at the University of Alberta, teaching LIS 598 Indigenous Librarianship within a Canadian context, and a co-host for masinahikan iskwêwak: Book Women Podcast.

 

A Salmon Arm Roots and Blues Festival veteran, Kenthen Thomas’s past performances have also included stints with Secwepemc Native Theatre, Dreamweaver Theatre (Simon Fraser University), Senclip Native Theatre, Caravan Farm Theatre, and Shuswap Theatre. He appeared in voice in the CBC legends series that aired nationwide in 2006. He now teaches full time with School District 73 as an Aboriginal resource teacher. Kenthen was involved with the roots and blues festival (2007, 2013, 2014, 1015) doing both storytelling and the Secwepemc grand opening for the entire festival. He co-wrote, co-directed, and starred in a play for Shuswap Theatre called Legends in 2012, which had a 22-show run through the summer, and he has been travelling around teaching and telling stories across B.C. He has helped with the Aboriginal celebration and Canada Day festivities in Salmon Arm and schools in the Lower Mainland and Interior. As a First Nations performer, Kenthen captivates audiences with his fascinating retellings of legends of the Secwepemc, his family land for more than 10,000 years. This is where his late grandmother, respected and legendary Secwepemc Elder the late Dr. Mary Thomas, taught him the traditional art of storytelling. Storytelling for the Shuswap people brought entertainment to families during long winter nights. It was also a way to keep history alive, tell important lessons, and share amusing anecdotes about all the creatures found on this land. Kenthen heard from his grandmother Mary how a bear and coyote learned to create a balance between night and day. There are also stories about how trusting the advice of Coyote (Seklep) caused Bear to lose his once long and lovely tail. Tricky Coyote features in many Secwepemc legends and is often the example of how not to behave. Other legends that have been passed down through Kenthen’s family for generations feature the animals, birds, and fish that were once integral to the lives of the original residents of this region. Their language, Secwepemctsin, and these stories have become marginalized and even endangered because of the predominance and ethnocentrism of English language and culture in Canada.

This notice is to inform you that this session will be recorded, archived, and made available publicly on BCcampus.ca. By participating in this session, you acknowledge that your participation in this session will be recorded and the recording will be made available openly. 

May
24
Tue
Indigenous Open Educational Resources: Respectfully Uplifting Community Voices
May 24 @ 10:00 am – 11:00 am
Indigenous Open Educational Resources: Respectfully Uplifting Community Voices

Open education is grounded in Western understandings of ownership, protocol, and accessibility. Often open education has a goal of making all knowledges available for all peoples. Within Canadian copyright law is tension with Indigenous knowledges and Indigenous ways of knowing and being. The open education community must carefully consider Indigenous knowledges and self-determination, which are deeply rooted in community-defined ethics and protocols and do not fit into ordinary academic contexts. This session will explore some of the concerns around open educational resources (OER) and Indigenous knowledges while using Indigenous worldviews to better understand how Indigenous knowledges can be respectfully incorporated into OER.

Facilitator

Kayla Lar-Son is of Métis and Ukranian settler ancestry, originally from Treaty Six territory, Tofield, Alberta. She currently resides on the unceded territories of the xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam), Sḵwx̱wú7mesh (Squamish), and Sel̓íl̓witulh (Tsleil-Waututh) Nations. At UBC Kayla is the Indigenous programs and services librarian at the Xwi7xwa Library and the program manager librarian for the Indigitization program. Kayla is also a co-host of masinahikan iskwêwak: the Book Women Podcast.

Register now!

This notice is to inform you that this session will be recorded, archived, and made available publicly on BCcampus.ca. By participating in this session, you acknowledge that your participation in this session will be recorded and the recording will be made available openly. 

Jun
6
Mon
FLO MicroCourse: Rubrics
Jun 6 – Jun 12 all-day
FLO MicroCourse: Rubrics

Our FLO MicroCourses are designed to focus on specific topics and learning needs while also developing digital literacy in faculty and educators. Well-designed and well-delivered rubrics are effective tools for evaluation and learning. Join us for this practical FLO MicroCourse that focuses specifically on rubrics. Create a rubric that will clarify course expectations, guide your learners, and assess their progress. Learn what goes into the process, then do it! This course takes place over five days, with a bit of spillover into the weekend to tie up loose ends. The idea is to provide a supportive environment for you to ask questions, take risks, offer advice, and have fun. Total time commitment is approximately 60–90 minutes per day.

There will be one live and interactive Zoom lecture on Monday, June 6, 11 a.m.–noon PT (recorded) and a community of practice session on Friday, June 10, 9–10 a.m. PT.

You will leave this course with:

  • A deeper understanding of why we use rubrics, who they are for, and what makes a good one
  • New ideas and skills for creating rubrics
  • A first draft, with feedback

Your FLO Facilitator

Dr. Nicki Rehn (she/her) is a teaching and learning specialist who has worked in various capacities in Canadian higher education for 12 years. Nicki has been connected with BCcampus since 2019, winning OER grants, delivering workshops, and participating in symposiums and conferences. This will be the fourth time she has facilitated a course as part of the FLO series, and she loves them! Nicki has a doctorate in instructional technology and a master’s degree in curriculum and assessment. She has designed and taught countless assessment courses and workshops for New Brunswick College of Craft and Design, Coast Mountain College, Quest University, BCcampus, Northwest Polytechnic, and Ambrose University. Nicki promotes alternative assessment, assessment for learning approaches, and good rubric design every opportunity she can.

This MicroCourse has a non-refundable registration fee of $25.

Register now!

This notice is to inform you that this session will be recorded, archived, and made available publicly on BCcampus.ca. By participating in this session, you acknowledge that your participation in this session will be recorded and the recording will be made available openly. 

Jun
17
Fri
FLO Friday: Using Alternative Assessments to Balance Technology, Academic Integrity, and Stress Management Goals
Jun 17 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

Technology is frequently cited as the direct cause of the increase in academic fraud reported over the past two years of rapid, pandemic-driven adoption of online learning; it’s just as often promised as the only solution to this problem. However, over time, it has become clearer that technology is neither the sole cause of academic misconduct nor a “magic bullet” to protect academic integrity; instead, understanding how design of alternative assessments can reduce learner stress is more helpful in mitigating academic fraud and ensuring technology integration works for learners and educators (and not the other way around!). This FLO Friday workshop will describe the interplay between technology, stress, and academic fraud and help you identify alternative assessments that can minimize student stress, improve student engagement, and protect academic integrity.

FLO Facilitator

Elle Ting (she/her) is a BCcampus Research Fellow and Vancouver Community College (VCC) Research Ethics Board chair and faculty member. She joined VCC in 2004 as a University Transfer English instructor and has since served the college as department head of Humanities; instructional associate with the Centre for Teaching, Learning, and Research; and Education Council chair. Working in different roles at VCC has given Elle a panoramic view of the college’s work and allowed her to engage with a wide variety of teams and projects within and outside the college, including BCcampus and the BC Applied Research and Innovation Network, the latter of which she co-chairs. Elle’s study interests include academic integrity, research ethics principles and practices, and war culture; her non-academic interests include eating, The Simpsons, and terrible wordplay.

This event is free. To ensure we have an inclusive and welcoming environment for all, we’ve added registration to all our sessions.

Register Now!

This notice is to inform you that this session will be recorded, archived, and made available publicly on BCcampus.ca. By participating in this session, you acknowledge that your participation in this session will be recorded and the recording will be made available openly.

Jul
18
Mon
FLO MicroCourse: Considerations to Indigenize Your Work
Jul 18 – Jul 24 all-day
FLO MicroCourse: Considerations to Indigenize Your Work

Facilitating learning online (FLO) MicroCourses are short, single-topic, hands-on and practical. They are designed to develop digital literacy in faculty and educators. In one week you will have an opportunity to dip into the FLO experience and leave with something practical and useful for your own teaching practice. Join us for our FLO MicroCourse: Considerations to Indigenize Your Work. In this course you will explore how you might reframe Indigenous pedagogies in online (and face-to-face) environments, including encouraging participation and creating relationships. Please put aside an average of two hours per day to become acquainted with the materials and contribute to your overall advancement as well as that of the group. You will be invited to contribute with your reflections in two posts.

This course runs from July 18 – 24, 2022. We hope you can join us for two synchronous sessions, July 19 and July 21, 12:00 p.m. –1:30 p.m.

FLO facilitators:

Gabrielle Lamontagne (she/her) is the coordinator of Collaborative Projects and Indigenization at BCcampus. She is a Métis woman originally from Winnipeg. Her background is in library and information studies, Indigenous land claims, and archival research.

María del Carmen Rodríguez de France (she/her) was born and raised in Monterrey, México, where she loved living and learning as a teacher for 15 years. Carmen acknowledges the privilege and responsibility of living on the land of the W̱SÁNEĆ Nation and the Lekwungen- and SENCOTEN-speaking peoples since 2006. Carmen is a faculty member in the Department of Indigenous Education at the University of Victoria, where she facilitates courses on Indigenous pedagogy and education as well as on social justice. Learn more about Carmen.

This MicroCourse has a non-refundable registration fee of $25.

Registration coming soon!

This notice is to inform you that this session will be recorded, archived, and made available publicly on BCcampus.ca. By participating in this session, you acknowledge that your participation in this session will be recorded and the recording will be made available openly. 

Jul
28
Thu
OER Production Series: Introduction to Pressbooks
Jul 28 @ 10:00 am – 11:00 am
OER Production Series: Introduction to Pressbooks

This event is a part of the OER Production Series and is part one of two that will discuss how to use Pressbooks to create and share open educational resources (OER). We will introduce Pressbooks and show you how to create and share OER with students and fellow educators. Pressbooks is an online self-publishing tool available to all post-secondary faculty and staff in B.C. and the Yukon. Topics include an introduction to Pressbooks, how to create an account, how to create a book in Pressbooks, and an overview of the Pressbooks editor. The webinar will also introduce such topics as creating math equations using MathJax, importing content, H5P, and sharing books in multiple formats.

Facilitator:

Harper Friedman (he/him) is a coordinator of Open Textbook Publishing at BCcampus. A recent graduate of the University of Victoria, he is using his skills to help create openly licensed educational resources, primarily in Pressbooks. Through this work he has developed his knowledge of Pressbooks and LaTeX as well as accessibility best practices.

This event is free. To ensure we have an inclusive and welcoming environment for all, we’ve added registration to all our sessions.

Registration coming soon!

This notice is to inform you that this session will be recorded, archived, and made available publicly on BCcampus.ca. By participating in this session, you acknowledge that your participation in this session will be recorded and the recording will be made available openly. 

Aug
11
Thu
OER Production Series: Technical Accessibility in OER
Aug 11 @ 10:00 am – 11:00 am
OER Production Series: Technical Accessibility in OER

This event is a part of the OER Production Series and is part one of our exploration of accessibility and Universal Design for Learning in open educational resources (OER). In this webinar we will introduce how to design OER so they meet Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG). We describe the principles behind WCAG, introduce some different assistive technologies, and explain how to create accessible tables, images, videos, audio, links, and math equations. By creating educational materials with accessibility in mind, we can ensure these resources are more useful, powerful, and accessible to all. This session will include lots of concrete examples and opportunities to apply learning.

Facilitator:

Harper Friedman (he/him) is a coordinator of Open Textbook Publishing at BCcampus. A recent graduate of the University of Victoria, he is using his skills to help create OER, primarily in Pressbooks. As part of his work, Harper has been learning accessibility best practices in OER and making educational resources more accessible for a greater variety of students.

This event is free. To ensure we have an inclusive and welcoming environment for all, we’ve added registration to all our sessions.

Registration coming soon!

This notice is to inform you that this session will be recorded, archived, and made available publicly on BCcampus.ca. By participating in this session, you acknowledge that your participation in this session will be recorded and the recording will be made available openly. 

Aug
16
Tue
OER Production Series: Applying Universal Design for Learning to Open Educational Resources
Aug 16 @ 10:00 am – 11:00 am
OER Production Series: Applying Universal Design for Learning to Open Educational Resources

This event is a part of the OER Production Series and is part two of our exploration of accessibility and Universal Design for Learning (UDL) in open educational resources (OER). In this session we build on what we know about technical accessibility to explore how we can go beyond minimum accessibility requirements. We dig into concepts like the social model of disability and how UDL can be applied in the design of OER. We explore multimodality as well as the benefits, challenges, and considerations of digital vs. print formats. This session will include lots of concrete examples and opportunities to apply learning.

Facilitator:

Josie Gray (she/her) is the manager of Production and Publishing at BCcampus. She manages the B.C. Open Textbook Collection and provides training and support for B.C. faculty publishing open textbooks in Pressbooks. Josie has been learning about and teaching accessibility best practices in OER for six years and completed her Master of Design in Inclusive Design degree at OCAD University in 2021.

This event is free. To ensure we have an inclusive and welcoming environment for all, we’ve added registration to all our sessions.

Registration coming soon!

This notice is to inform you that this session will be recorded, archived, and made available publicly on BCcampus.ca. By participating in this session, you acknowledge that your participation in this session will be recorded and the recording will be made available openly.