Feb
2
Wed
Decolonizing Process: Lessons Learned
Feb 2 @ 9:30 am – 10:30 am

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada exposed the need for post-secondary institutions to take action on the ongoing impacts of colonialism on education and the inclusion of Indigenous worldviews in teaching and learning practices. As institutions embark on this work, it is vital they consider not only what changes need to be made but also how they will move forward to respond to Indigenization, decolonization, and the commitments in the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Calls to Action. In this session Vancouver Island University Child and Youth Care faculty will share lessons learned as they engaged in a process to co-create and articulate a decolonial approach to practice within the program. Join to gain insights about elements of the process that facilitated the creation of a collective vision for moving toward reconciliation.

Bios:

Manjeet Uppal (He/him)

Manjeet’s professional background includes nearly 20 years of working with Aboriginal and First Nations communities around services to children, youth, and families. Manjeet’s active involvement in many community projects includes the development of a street-worker program and drop-in centre for youth; an organizing role in community outreach programs, including suicide prevention and intervention committees; and committees to end domestic violence. He has also served on the advisory board of a family health centre/pregnancy-outreach program and the Victoria Family Court Committee. He is a social activist and is involved in many political and social causes. Manjeet joined the Vancouver Island University faculty of Child and Youth Care in 2007. He has taught in the Child and Youth Care program at University of Victoria and with the Aboriginal Child Welfare Training Project. Areas of specialty include child- and youth-care practice in Aboriginal and First Nations Communities, diversity and cross-cultural practice, statutory child welfare practice, youth criminal justice, youth-based practice, and community development.

Teri Derksen (She/her)

Teri has worked for over 20 years in the field of child and youth care, primarily with adolescents, as a front-line worker, program administrator, and community development worker in the non-profit sector and in municipal government. Teri has a passion for activity-based child- and youth-care work, which is grounded in the many poignant experiences she has had hiking, climbing, paddling, and just hanging around in nature with youth. Teri has also had the opportunity to work extensively with communities as both a community programmer and a community youth development worker for municipal social planning and recreation departments. Her interest in communities became a major focus for her graduate work, which culminated in her master’s thesis, titled Community-Level Interventions in Child and Youth Care Practice. Teri has been a national trainer for an international organization dedicated to cross-cultural and peace education, has facilitated life-skills workshops for youth, and has taught in recreation and child- and youth-care programs at the University of Victoria and Vancouver Island University. Teri brings her passion for communities and activity-based work to the classroom, where she strives to work with students to create a climate for learning through play, exploration, and active participation.

Stephen Javorski (He/him)

Stephen is a professor in the Child and Youth Care department at Vancouver Island University. He has over 20 years of experience working with youth and young adults as a facilitator, guide, program manager, and counsellor, offering educational and therapeutic programming in settings ranging from schools to challenge courses to multi-week canoe expeditions in Canada’s North. He has a master’s degree in transpersonal counselling psychology with a wilderness therapy specialization from Naropa University. He is currently completing his PhD in outdoor experiential education with a focus on outdoor behavioural healthcare at the University of New Hampshire. Stephen’s research interests include risk management and predictors of clinical change in outdoor behavioural healthcare programs and applications of adventure therapy/activity-based interventions in community settings. He is a research associate for the Outdoor Behavioural Healthcare Centre and the National Association of Therapeutic Schools and Programs, is a member of the Association for Experiential Education, and has served on the leadership council for the Therapeutic Adventure Professional Group.

This event is free. To ensure we have an inclusive and welcoming environment for all, we’ve added registration to all our sessions.

Register now!

This notice is to inform you that this session will be recorded, archived, and made available publicly on BCcampus.ca. By participating in this session, you acknowledge that your participation in this session will be recorded and the recording will be made available openly. 

Women in Trades
Feb 2 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Women in Trades

This is an open event for women in the skilled trades (apprentices, journey-people, and faculty) to gather for the purpose of sharing ideas, experiences, success stories, and struggles with being in the skilled trades. Building communities of practice is essential to the successful journey from apprentice to graduate. We will be hosting a few women Trades faculty to share their stories and ideas on how we can encourage and promote more women to enter and more importantly complete their training and education in the skilled trades.

While this session focuses on the experiences of women, people of all genders are welcome to attend and listen.

This event is free. To ensure we have an inclusive and welcoming environment for all, we’ve added registration to all our sessions.

Register now!

This notice is to inform you that this session will be recorded, archived, and made available publicly on BCcampus.ca. By participating in this session, you acknowledge that your participation in this session will be recorded and the recording will be made available openly.

Feb
17
Thu
Pulling Together Series for Trades Faculty
Feb 17 @ 2:00 pm – Mar 24 @ 4:00 pm
Pulling Together Series for Trades Faculty

This series is a provincial initiative hosted by BCcampus and facilitated by Jewell Gilles with the intention of delivering the Pulling Together: Foundations Guide for Trades faculty across the province. One of the purposes of the event is to encourage Trades faculty to begin or build on the inclusion of Indigenous knowledge in future curriculum development and delivery. Recognizing that each region may have its own influence and application, it might be advantageous to highlight those regional distinctions along with the knowledge found in the Foundations guide. This is the first offering of its kind where we hope to include apprentice and recent-graduate stories and experiences.

Pulling Together: A Guide for Indigenization of Post-Secondary Institutions is a set of professional learning guides that are the result of collaboration between BCcampus, the Ministry of Advanced Education and Skills Training, and a steering committee of Indigenous education leaders. The content in these guides is authored by teams of Indigenous and ally writers from across B.C.

Facilitator:

Jewell Gillies (them/their) is Musgmagw Dzawada’enuwx (Wolf Clan) of the Kwakwakawakw Nation. Jewell is a two-spirit Indigenous person. Jewell is an anti-oppression facilitator who covers topics that range from justice, equity, diversity, and inclusion to sexual violence prevention, mental health and wellness, and naturalizing Indigenous worldviews into higher education. Jewell’s work as a police constable for the City of Vancouver prior to working in the education sector provides them with a wealth of experience in trauma-informed care and supports for intersectional community members who identify within historically excluded community groups.

This is a multi-day event with one synchronous session each Thursday from 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m., February 17 to March 24.

This event is free. To ensure we have an inclusive and welcoming environment for all, we’ve added registration to all our sessions.

Registration coming soon!

This notice is to inform you that this session will be recorded, archived, and made available publicly on BCcampus.ca. By participating in this session, you acknowledge that your participation in this session will be recorded and the recording will be made available openly. 

Feb
18
Fri
FLO Friday: Alternative Assessment: Negotiating Standards
Feb 18 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm
FLO Friday: Alternative Assessment: Negotiating Standards

As assessment validity increases, evaluation reliability decreases. This matters to instructors who are interested in moving away from multiple-choice tests and toward alternative assessments. In this FLO Friday, we will discuss ways to increase evaluation reliability by negotiating standards with students and colleagues. We will examine exemplars, calibration activities, student-built rubrics, and conversations about quality. At the end of this session you will be able to:

  • Identify the paradox between validity and reliability.
  • Improve the evaluation reliability of at least one of your alternative assessments.
  • Invite students into the conversation about quality.

Your FLO facilitator for this session is the fabulous Nicki Rehn (she/her). Nicki is currently a learning transformation specialist at the New Brunswick College of Craft and Design in Fredericton. She has been connected with BCcampus since 2019, winning open educational resource grants, delivering workshops, and participating in symposiums and conferences. She is excited to be part of the FLO series. Nicki has a doctorate in instructional technology and a master’s degree in curriculum and assessment. She has designed and taught countless assessment courses and workshops over the past 13 years for Coast Mountain College, Quest University, BCcampus, and Ambrose University. She also worked as an instructional designer for the Southern Alberta Institute of Technology for three years, aligning assessment to outcomes. Nicki promotes alternative assessment and assessment for learning approaches every opportunity she can.

This event is free. To ensure we have an inclusive and welcoming environment for all, we’ve added registration to all our sessions.

Registration now!

This notice is to inform you that this session will be recorded, archived, and made available publicly on BCcampus.ca. By participating in this session, you acknowledge that your participation in this session will be recorded and the recording will be made available openly. 

Feb
23
Wed
Fair Dealing Week 2022
Feb 23 @ 10:00 am – 1:00 pm
Fair Dealing Week 2022

This year, to celebrate Fair Dealing Week, the Lower Mainland Copyright Consortium (CapU, Douglas, JIBC, SFU, and UBC) and the Alberta Copyright Consortium (U of A, U of C, MRU and NAIT) will be co-hosting an online event on Wednesday, February 23.

Time: 10:00 a.m. -11:00 a.m. PST
Speaker: Dr. Carys J. Craig, Associate Professor, Osgoode Hall Law School, York University
Presentation: Best Practices for OER in Canada: A Fresh Look at Fair Dealing for Educational Use

In this session, Dr. Carys Craig will speak about the Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Open Educational Resources, focusing on Appendix 3: Educational Fair Dealing in Canada (which she authored for the Code).

Time: 12:00 p.m. -1:00 p.m. PST
Speaker: Dr. Meera Nair, Copyright Specialist, Northern Alberta Institute of Technology
Presentation: Fair Dealing’s future – artificial intelligence or willful ignorance?

Following a review of Canada’s Copyright Act in 2018, the then-Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology stated that “facilitating the informational analysis of lawfully acquired copyrighted content could help Canada’s promising future in artificial intelligence to become reality,” and recommended the Act be amended as necessary to support this vision.

For more information and to register visit UBC event page.

Technology-Facilitated Sexual Violence: What It Is and How To Help
Feb 23 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Technology-Facilitated Sexual Violence: What It Is and How To Help

Technology is increasingly used by abusers to perpetrate sexualized violence and abuse. However, individuals who work in traditional anti-sexual violence support positions may be unfamiliar with these forms of violence or not know how to support students being victimized in these ways. This workshop offers an introduction to the issue of technology-facilitated sexual violence (TFSV) and abuse. It will define what this term means and describe various forms of it. The presenters will cover forms of TFSV that occur in close relationships, such as between intimate partners or friends, and TFSV in broader social groups, such as attacks in digital classrooms or on social media by classmates, acquaintances, or strangers. Following a description of the issue, specific example situations, and discussion about the harms caused by TFSV, the workshop will share various resources related to supporting victim-survivors. This will include TFSV safety-planning considerations, links to organizations with practical information and tip sheets, and other helpful guidelines for people experiencing TFSV and those providing support to them.

Bios:

Suzie Dunn (she/her) is an assistant professor at Dalhousie’s Schulich School of Law and a PhD candidate at the University of Ottawa. Her research centres on the intersections of equality, technology, and the law, with a specific focus on technology-facilitated violence, deepfakes, and impersonation in digital spaces. She sits on the Women’s Legal Education and Action Fund’s Technology Facilitated Violence Project committee, is an associate member of the Centre for Law Technology and Society, and is a senior fellow with the Centre for International Governance Innovation. You can find her on Twitter @SuzieMDunn or on her website: www.suziedunn.com

Cynthia Khoo (she/her) is a Canadian technology and human rights lawyer and an associate at the Center on Privacy and Technology at Georgetown Law in Washington, D.C. She is also a research fellow at the Citizen Lab (Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, University of Toronto) and a member of the board of directors of the Open Privacy Research Society. Her work focuses on how the internet and emerging technologies impact historically marginalized groups, including issues such as platform liability for online abuse, algorithmic decision-making (in criminal, civil, and commercial contexts), and worker surveillance. Follow her on Twitter at @cyn_k or visit her website at www.tekhnoslaw.ca.

This event is free. To ensure we have an inclusive and welcoming environment for all, we’ve added registration to all our sessions.

Register now

This notice is to inform you that this session will be recorded, archived, and made available publicly on BCcampus.ca. By participating in this session, you acknowledge that your participation in this session will be recorded and the recording will be made available openly.

Mar
7
Mon
FLO MicroCourse: Alternative Assessment
Mar 7 – Mar 13 all-day
FLO MicroCourse: Alternative Assessment

We are back with another delivery of our very popular course on alternative assessment. Join our one-week FLO MicroCourse on authentic and alternative assessment, during which you will have the opportunity to discuss and explore the purpose of assessments and how to prioritize outcomes, and you will dabble in some evaluation criteria and rubrics.

By the end of this FLO course, participants will be able to:

  • Outline the purpose of assessment in higher education.
  • Explain authentic assessment.
  • Prioritize the evaluation of outcomes when designing assessment.
  • Choose from the variety of options for alternative assessment (portfolio, journal, non-disposable assignment, summary, viva voce, project, presentation, authentic task, self-assessment, etc.).

The course officially runs asynchronously for one week, but peer feedback on the final task can continue beyond that week. We will upload a new module of content to Moodle each day. You can expect to spend at least 90 minutes per day over the five days; however, you are welcome to invest more time if you want to work on your own assessment design. Active participation will make a richer experience for all participants.

In addition, there are two optional, recorded synchronous sessions:

  • Tuesday, March 8, 9–10 a.m. PST
  • Friday, March 11, 9–10 a.m. PST

Facilitator:

Nicki Rehn is currently a learning transformation specialist at the New Brunswick College of Craft and Design in Fredericton. Nicki has been connected with BCcampus since 2019, winning open educational resource grants, delivering workshops, and participating in symposiums and conferences. She is excited to be part of the FLO series. Nicki has a doctorate in instructional technology and a master’s degree in curriculum and assessment. She has designed and taught countless assessment courses and workshops over the past 13 years for Coast Mountain College, Quest University, BCcampus, and Ambrose University. She also worked as an instructional designer for Southern Alberta Institute of Technology for three years, aligning assessment to outcomes. Nicki promotes alternative assessment and assessment for learning approaches every opportunity she can.

This event has a non-refundable $25 registration fee.

Register now! 

This notice is to inform you that this session will be recorded, archived, and made available publicly on BCcampus.ca. By participating in this session, you acknowledge that your participation in this session will be recorded and the recording will be made available openly.

Open Education 101
Mar 7 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm
Open Education 101

This session will provide an overview to the open education movement including what it is and why it matters. This session will cover: 

  • Definition and examples of open educational resources
  • Benefits of OER to both students and faculty
  • First steps toward adopting, adapting, or creating OER 
  • How to find additional support with OE at UBC Library

For more information and to register visit UBC event page.

This event is part of Open Education Week (March 7 – 11, 2022)

An annual celebration, Open Education Week (OE Week) is an opportunity for actively sharing and learning about the latest achievements in Open Education worldwide.

Mar
8
Tue
Copyright and Licensing in Open Educational Resources
Mar 8 @ 11:00 am – 12:30 pm
Copyright and Licensing in Open Educational Resources

Does your project include work created by others? Do you have questions about Creative Commons licenses and how to incorporate licensed works into your project? This session will introduce you to copyright basics for your OER project and take you through licensing considerations to insure that your work is reusable by others. Importantly it will also provide you with a simple workflow to help you identify and respect Creative Commons licensed works.

This session will cover:

  • Copyright basics including how copyright is assigned to a work
  • Rationale behind and purpose of open licenses
  • Identifying the 6 Creative Commons licenses and know how to assign them to OER
  • Applying Creative Commons licenses and ensure compatibility among the CC licensed works

For more information and to register visit UBC event page.

This event is part of Open Education Week (March 7 – 11, 2022)

An annual celebration, Open Education Week (OE Week) is an opportunity for actively sharing and learning about the latest achievements in Open Education worldwide.

Finding and Using OER
Mar 8 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Finding and Using OER

Whether adapting an existing OER, transitioning your course materials into the Open, or creating an OER from scratch, you will likely be using materials created by others. Because Open doesn’t just apply to the finished resource but all of the elements within the resource, it is important to ensure that everything you include in your OER respects licensing requirements. In this session, we will walk you through some strategies for finding open content to adapt or include within your learning resources, as well as best practices for attribution. We will also provide you with guidance for developing your own search plan and documentation, including a workflow and templates for curating resource details.

This session will cover:

  • Identifying open educational resource repositories and online spaces for finding content
  • Developing a search plan for finding resources across platforms
  • Developing a workflow for curating resource details for use in an open educational resource project
  • Identifying terms of use and licensing of resources and attribution practice

For more information and to register visit UBC event page

This event is part of Open Education Week (March 7 – 11, 2022)
An annual celebration, Open Education Week (OE Week) is an opportunity for actively sharing and learning about the latest achievements in Open Education worldwide.