Sep
19
Sun
FLO Course: Trauma-Informed Teaching @ Asynchronous
Sep 19 – Oct 1 all-day

Join us for this exciting new FLO course on trauma-informed teaching for educators. By the end of this session, participants will be able to:  

  • Define trauma and trauma-informed teaching and practice.
  • Understand the six guiding principles of trauma-informed practice.
  • Identify, develop, and practice trauma-informed teaching strategies.
  • Understand the importance of boundaries and self-care.
  • Implement boundaries and self-care strategies.
  • Understand trigger warnings and evaluate their use.

The course will happen mostly asynchronously—you can study at your own pace and at a time that works for you—with two planned 90-minute synchronous sessions on September 20 and October 1 from 12–1:30 p.m. PST. Participants should expect to spend approximately 6 hours per week engaging with the course, including the 90-minutes synchronous session per week. Your co-facilitators for this course are Melinda Warfolk and Deb Nielsen.  

Deb Nielsen is a curriculum developer with the Centre for Teaching and Learning and an instructor in the English program at the College of New Caledonia (CNC). Her academic interests are motherhood and feminist studies, Indigenizing and interculturalizing curricula, student success, and open pedagogy. She holds a master’s degree in library and information Studies from San José State University in California and an MA in English from the University of Northern British Columbia. She is currently working on two open educational resources textbooks, co-writing Getting Ready for Work-Integrated Learning and creating H5P content for Technical Writing Essentials.

Melinda Worfolk (she/her) teaches English in the Academic Upgrading program at  CNC in Prince George, B.C. Since starting at CNC in 2001, she has taught a wide range of students from literacy level to second-year university. Her teaching and research interests include the role of empathy in teaching, Indigenization/decolonization of educational systems, culturally responsive pedagogies, and plain language as an access issue. She has a BA in English literature from the University of British Columbia and an MA in gender studies from the University of Northern British Columbia. Melinda is grateful to live, work, and play on the unceded territory of the Lheidli T’enneh. 

This is a paid event. There is a one-time registration fee of $25.

Register now!

This notice is to inform you that this session will be recorded, archived, and made available publicly on BCcampus.ca. By participating in this session, you acknowledge that your participation in this session will be recorded and the recording will be made available openly.

Oct
5
Tue
ACE-WIL Town Hall: Let’s Connect
Oct 5 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
ACE-WIL Town Hall: Let's Connect

Connect with your work-integrated learning (WIL) colleagues from across the province in the first town hall of fall 2021! Join your BCcampus host, Helena Prins, and Anna Jubilo, president of ACE-WIL, in exploring WIL initiatives, updates, and resources, with an opportunity to network in breakout rooms. Come and enjoy being part of a dynamic, inclusive, fun ACE-WIL community. This virtual session will be one hour in Zoom. Registration is free but required. 

This event is free. To ensure we have an inclusive and welcoming environment for all, we’ve added registration to all our sessions.

Register now!

This notice is to inform you that this session will be recorded, archived, and made available publicly on BCcampus.ca. By participating in this session, you acknowledge that your participation in this session will be recorded and the recording will be made available openly.

 

Oct
7
Thu
BCcampus Book Club Hub – How to Be an Antiracist
Oct 7 @ 10:00 am – Dec 2 @ 11:30 am
BCcampus Book Club Hub – How to Be an Antiracist

This fall our BCcampus Book Club will be a hub for book club leaders to both share and garner skills in facilitating discussions about the difference between being non-racist versus anti-racist. We invite book club leaders from post-secondary institutions across the province to join our hub. This is a province-wide invitation to learn how to lead your own book club in our collaborative community, where candour and vulnerability are fostered in an ethical space! Hub participants will be expected to lead discussions and actively contribute to our learning community. You will leave with a greater support network and with actionable steps for how to apply and implement your anti-racist strategy on campus.

We invite a representative from your campus anti-racism or equity, diversity, and inclusion club or task force to register and participate in the Hub. We ask that no more than one representative from each B.C. institution participate. The Hub will be a social learning system where leaders from B.C. institutions have a forum for discussion, share collaborative tools, and gain some BCcampus open educational resources to adapt for your own campus and culture.

The BCcampus Book Club Hub participant from your institution will be expected to:

  • Read How to Be an Antiracist by Ibram X. Kendi before the Hub’s first session.
  • Facilitate at least one discussion forum.
  • Participate in our weekly exercise/artifact/case study.
  • Contribute to the camaraderie and co-learning principles as established by our group charter.

Once finished the book, participants can expect to spend 5-10 hours per week on additional learning and facilitation activities that will support their planning and prep work for running their own book club.

Using Ibram X. Kendi’s book – How to Be an Antiracist — as our backdrop, the BCcampus Book Club Hub will unpack the meaning of anti-racism within our sector and local context. The Hub will occur through both biweekly synchronous sessions and asynchronous activities that incorporate multimedia, discussions, and reflection exercises. Looking at four themes (below), we will conclude each biweekly session with the development of an artifact from our collective exercises. The schedule and themes we will address in our sessions are:

  • October 7 – Kickoff: Community Building/Charter
  • October 14 – Session I: Self/Schemas
  • October 28 – Session II: Society/Structures
  • November 10/12 (TBC) — Session III: Schools/Syllabus and Panel Discussion with Guests
  • November 25 – Session IV: Success/Solidarity
  • December 2 – Wrap-Up

This event is free. To ensure we have an inclusive and welcoming environment for all, we’ve added registration to all our sessions.

Register now!

This notice is to inform you that this session will be recorded, archived, and made available publicly on BCcampus.ca. By participating in this session, you acknowledge that your participation in this session will be recorded and the recording will be made available openly.

If you have any questions please contact us at bookclub@bccampus.ca.

Oct
8
Fri
FLO Friday: Ungrading Unpacked!
Oct 8 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm
FLO Friday: Ungrading Unpacked!

Grading, feedback, assessment, and evaluation are all part of the instructional package, yet it appears to be grading that brings out the strongest reaction among instructors and remains a constant concern for students, instructors, and administrators. Are we grading properly? Are we too soft on students with our grading or too rigid? There seems to be very little in the way of a uniform approach when it comes to grading across educational institutes. One response to this dilemma has been a movement towardungrading, a practice that attempts to sidestep the demand to rate students against each other and replace it something more reflective of student learning and achievement. Advocates for ungrading have argued for taking grading out of the discourse of the class environment to focus on the more substantive learning opportunities provided by feedback, reflective practice, and meta-learning. Join your FLO facilitator, Dave Smulders, as he explores this topic! This session highlights his experiences with incorporating ungrading in a third-year university course at the University of British Columbia, with all the joy and disappointment that comes with experimentation on such a contentious subject. Ungrading, in his view, does not mean getting rid of the final letter or number attributed to students at the end of a course but rather de-centering the importance of that final grade in favour of encouraging students to take more responsibility for their learning as well as the learning of their fellow classmates. Come ready to share your ungrading stories or questions! 

Facilitator: 

Dave Smulders (he/him/his) Dave Smulders has been an instructional designer and teacher in a variety of capacities, both in B.C. and abroad, for almost 30 years. He teaches adult education courses in the Department of Educational Studies at the University of British Columbia and was the recipient of the Faculty of Education Sessional and Lecturer Teaching Prize in 2016. He is also a program manager of faculty development at the Justice Institute of British Columbia. In both roles, his work involves collaborating with students and faculty to strengthen the connection between teaching and learning.

This event is free. To ensure we have an inclusive and welcoming environment for all, we’ve added registration to all our sessions.

Register now!

This notice is to inform you that this session will be recorded, archived, and made available publicly on BCcampus.ca. By participating in this session, you acknowledge that your participation in this session will be recorded and the recording will be made available openly.

 

Oct
18
Mon
FLO MicroCourse: Digital Literacy to Fluency @ Asynchronous
Oct 18 – Oct 22 all-day

Transferring in-class classroom activities that promote learning into FLO-MicroCourseactivities that are effective in the online learning environment is challenging. This demands a high level of digital literacy, or comfort in evaluating, piloting, and adopting new technologies into your toolbox of educational resources. This one-week micro-course will demonstrate that technology is something that should be welcomed into the classroom to allow an instructor a growing repertoire of media that stimulates teaching and learning. Incorporating digital tools in the classroom also increases students’ digital literacy while they complete activities and assignments. Your lead FLO facilitator for this micro-course is Ken Harmel. Ken Harmel is a family guy working as a senior learning designer at the University of the Fraser Valley (UFV). He began teaching in the tech sector and then spent 13 years in Japan honing his teaching skills with Japan Airlines Academy. Intrigued by the potential of distance education, he acquired his M.Ed. on that topic and thus began his pursuit of the elusive perfect online course. Ken has been a member of the BCcampus community for years and contributes much of his success at UFV to the professional development that BCcampus offers. 

Please Note: This FLO MicroCourse is an asynchronous one-week course with one synchronous session on Tuesday, October 19, 2021, from 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. (Pacific Time).

This event is free. To ensure we have an inclusive and welcoming environment for all, we’ve added registration to all our sessions.

Register now!

This notice is to inform you that this session will be recorded, archived, and made available publicly on BCcampus.ca. By participating in this session, you acknowledge that your participation in this session will be recorded and the recording will be made available openly.

Oct
22
Fri
Accountability and Repairing Relationships: Two-Part Workshop
Oct 22 @ 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm
Accountability and Repairing Relationships: Two-Part Workshop

This two-part workshop is designed to support B.C. post-secondary institutions with the delivery of the recently released Accountability and Repairing Relationships: Training and Facilitation Guide for preventing and responding to sexual violence.

Part 1: October 22, 2–3:30 p.m.
This session will introduce participants to the foundations of the Accountability and Repairing Relationships resource. We will touch on strategies to prepare for delivery of the training, introduce response-based practice ideas, and provide time for questions, reflection, and discussion.

Part 2: October 29, 2-­3:30 p.m.
This session will start with overview of the Accountability and Repairing Relationships training modules and share feedback we have received to date. We will then guide participants through a reflective activity about working with people who have caused harm, and we’ll end with space for discussion about peer connection and moving the work forward. Note: Attendees have the option to attend both or one of these workshops; however, we recommend you attend both when possible.

Facilitators: 

Meaghan Hagerty (she/her) has a master of science in global health and is currently a doctoral student in community engagement, social change, and equity at UBC Okanagan. Between these degrees, Meaghan worked at Thompson Rivers University in roles connected to wellness and sexualized violence prevention and response. To balance out homework (or as procrastination tools), Meaghan likes to get outside, plan hypothetical trips for the future, watch the Bachelor and The Bachelorette with a running feminist critique, and spend time with her people and their dogs.

Amber Huva (she/her) is on parental leave until November 2021 from her position at Thompson Rivers University as sexualized violence prevention and response manager. Previous to being in this role on campus, Amber worked in community with women and children fleeing violence as well as with youth and adults experiencing homelessness, poverty, and concerns around mental health and substance use. Amber has a master’s degree in social work and has been in the field for close to 15 years. This year Amber grew a pandemic veggie garden, and it was marvellous. When she’s not busy caring for small kiddos or watching Netflix, she likes getting out to paddle and hike.

Register now!

This notice is to inform you that this session will be recorded, archived, and made available publicly on BCcampus.ca. By participating in this session, you acknowledge that your participation in this session will be recorded and the recording will be made available openly.

Oct
29
Fri
FLO Friday: Accessible Course Design – Separating Content from Delivery
Oct 29 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm
FLO Friday: Accessible Course Design - Separating Content from Delivery

The pandemic has taught us the importance of planning for flexibility. While respecting the integrity of content, facilitator Dr. Richard Jackson will describe how he designs coursework for face-to-face, flipped, blended, or fully remote delivery with Universal Design for Learning principles in mind. In this one-hour Zoom session, you will: 

  • Discover how digital media and technology tools support flexible content delivery.  
  • Learn how to operationalize goals to enable multiple means of achievement.  
  • Identify instructional practices to retain post-pandemic  

Come and join us for this interactive session! 

Dr. Richard Jackson, associate professor at Boston College and senior research scientist with CAST, is internationally recognized as a pioneer in the nascent field of Universal Design for Learning. Dr. Jackson brings many years of experience as a teacher, project director, researcher, and advocate in the field of education and visual disabilities. You can read more about his work here. We are thrilled to have him facilitate his first FLO Friday with BCcampus! 

This event is free. To ensure we have an inclusive and welcoming environment for all, we’ve added registration to all our sessions.

Register now!

This notice is to inform you that this session will be recorded, archived, and made available publicly on BCcampus.ca. By participating in this session, you acknowledge that your participation in this session will be recorded and the recording will be made available openly.

Accountability and Repairing Relationships: Two-Part Workshop
Oct 29 @ 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm
Accountability and Repairing Relationships: Two-Part Workshop

This two-part workshop is designed to support B.C. post-secondary institutions with the delivery of the recently released Accountability and Repairing Relationships: Training and Facilitation Guide for preventing and responding to sexual violence.

Part 1: October 22, 2–3:30 p.m.
This session will introduce participants to the foundations of the Accountability and Repairing Relationships resource. We will touch on strategies to prepare for delivery of the training, introduce response-based practice ideas, and provide time for questions, reflection, and discussion.

Part 2: October 29, 2-­3:30 p.m.
This session will start with overview of the Accountability and Repairing Relationships training modules and share feedback we have received to date. We will then guide participants through a reflective activity about working with people who have caused harm, and we’ll end with space for discussion about peer connection and moving the work forward. Note: Attendees have the option to attend both or one of these workshops; however, we recommend you attend both when possible.

Facilitators: 

Meaghan Hagerty (she/her) has a master of science in global health and is currently a doctoral student in community engagement, social change, and equity at UBC Okanagan. Between these degrees, Meaghan worked at Thompson Rivers University in roles connected to wellness and sexualized violence prevention and response. To balance out homework (or as procrastination tools), Meaghan likes to get outside, plan hypothetical trips for the future, watch the Bachelor and The Bachelorette with a running feminist critique, and spend time with her people and their dogs.

Amber Huva (she/her) is on parental leave until November 2021 from her position at Thompson Rivers University as sexualized violence prevention and response manager. Previous to being in this role on campus, Amber worked in community with women and children fleeing violence as well as with youth and adults experiencing homelessness, poverty, and concerns around mental health and substance use. Amber has a master’s degree in social work and has been in the field for close to 15 years. This year Amber grew a pandemic veggie garden, and it was marvellous. When she’s not busy caring for small kiddos or watching Netflix, she likes getting out to paddle and hike.

Register now!

This notice is to inform you that this session will be recorded, archived, and made available publicly on BCcampus.ca. By participating in this session, you acknowledge that your participation in this session will be recorded and the recording will be made available openly.

Nov
3
Wed
Capacity to Connect Information Session: Prepare to Adapt and Offer
Nov 3 @ 9:00 am – 10:00 am
Capacity to Connect Information Session: Prepare to Adapt and Offer

This session prepares facilitators to adopt and offer Capacity to Connect: Supporting Students’ Mental Health and Wellness. This adaptable training resource covers foundational mental health and wellness knowledge for post-secondary faculty and staff and ways to support students in distress. It can be used for two-hour online or in-person training.

Presenter information: 

Matty Hillman, MA (CYC) is a child and youth care instructor at Selkirk College in the beautiful Kootenay region of B.C., the traditional territory of the Sinixt people. His research interests include sexual violence prevention and response on post-secondary campuses, healthy masculinities, and critical youth mentorship. As a muralist, he is especially interested in the intersection of youth work and public art, exploring the opportunity these complimentary practices create for empowerment, community building, and social justice advancements. Readers may contact Matty at mhillman@selkirk.ca and access his full bio at http://selkirk.ca/faculty/matthew-matty-hillman. 

Jewell Gillies is Musgmagw Dzawada’enuwx (Wolf Clan) of the Kwakwakawakw Nation. Jewell is a two–spirit Indigenous person who has them/them/their pronouns. Jewell is an anti-oppression facilitator who covers topics from justice, equity, diversity, and inclusion; sexual violence prevention; and mental health and wellness to naturalizing Indigenous worldviews into higher education. Jewell’s work as a police constable for the City of Vancouver prior to working in the education sector provides them with a wealth of experience in trauma-informed care and supports for intersectional community members who identify within historically excluded community groups. 

This event is free. To ensure we have an inclusive and welcoming environment for all, we’ve added registration to all our sessions.

Register now!

This notice is to inform you that this session will be recorded, archived, and made available publicly on BCcampus.ca. By participating in this session, you acknowledge that your participation in this session will be recorded and the recording will be made available openly.

Nov
9
Tue
Let’s Talk About Suicide Info Session
Nov 9 @ 9:00 am – 10:00 am
Let's Talk About Suicide Info Session

This session prepares facilitators to adopt and offer Let’s Talk About Suicide: Raising Awareness and Supporting Students. This adaptable resource offers sensitive, respectful, and detailed training on suicide awareness and response. It can be used for two-hour synchronous training or for self-study. It was developed to reduce the stigma around suicide and to help faculty and staff acquire the skills and confidence to ask if a student is considering suicide, listen to that student in a non-judgmental way, and refer the student to appropriate resources.

Presenter information:

Dawn Schell is manager of mental-health outreach and training at the University of Victoria. She has facilitated over 300 mental-health literacy sessions for staff and faculty over the past seven years. Recently Dawn has focused on re-entry anxiety and its impact on students, staff, and faculty. 

Michelle Glubke has worked with post-secondary institutions for the last 15 years in the use of enterprise systems and educational technologies and in the creation of open curriculum and training resources. She leads large cross-sector collaborations and is working with BCcampus on mental health and wellness training resources. She was most inspired this year by the student team that co-created practice scenarios for an upcoming mental health and wellness training for students. She is committed to respectful relationships with the Indigenous peoples on whose traditional unceded territories she and her family live in W̱JOȽEȽP (Brentwood Bay), B.C., and Ottawa, Ontario. 

This event is free. To ensure we have an inclusive and welcoming environment for all, we’ve added registration to all our sessions.

Register now!

This notice is to inform you that this session will be recorded, archived, and made available publicly on BCcampus.ca. By participating in this session, you acknowledge that your participation in this session will be recorded and the recording will be made available openly.