Mar
1
Mon
FLO MicroCourse: Micro-credentials in the B.C. Context
Mar 1 – Mar 12 all-day

Micro-credentials are a relatively new innovation in post-secondary education, and FLO-MicroCoursemany post-secondary education stakeholders are considering how to apply them in B.C. As the name suggests, micro-credentials are small credentials that are uniquely focused on meeting competency needs in industry. One factor of their success is that education, industry, and students work together to ensure applicability. Often the first step of applying an innovation like micro-credentials is to understand it better.

Whether you work in post-secondary education or industry or are a student, join us to learn more. In this primarily asynchronous course, we will discuss the basics of micro-credentials, best practices from other regions, and stakeholder perspectives, and we’ll have a group discussion to discover at least one feasible application of micro-credentials in our province. We will also host two synchronous web-conference sessions, which will be recorded. Based on feedback from a previous offering, we lengthened this course from 5 to 12 days. This reduces the barrier of time and makes it easier to participate. Expect to spend 6 to 13 hours asynchronously over the 12-day period.

The optional synchronous sessions will be held via Zoom on Thursday, March 4, and Thursday, March 11, both at noon Pacific standard time.

This event is free. To ensure we have an inclusive and welcoming environment for all, we’ve added registration to our online office sessions.

Registration is now closed.

This notice is to inform you that this session will be recorded, archived, and made available publicly on BCcampus.ca. By participating in this session, you acknowledge that your participation in this session will be recorded and the recording will be made available openly.

Open Education Challenge Series 2021
Mar 1 – Mar 5 all-day
Open Education Challenge Series 2021
The series starts on Monday, March 1, 2021, and ends on Friday, March 5th, 2021 during OEWeek.
BCcampus is hosting an open education challenge series for educators interested in learning more about open education practices (OEP). This series is a fun way to get a taste of  OEP – over the course of 5 days, we will release 2 challenges per day.  A challenge is a micro activity that you can do in 10 minutes or less that will cover a small aspect of open education.

Who is this for?

The challenge series is open to anyone but has been designed for educators who are new to open education. You might have heard about OER, open textbooks, and perhaps even open pedagogy but if you don’t know where to find them or how to use or create them, then this is for you. This isn’t a bootcamp or a crash course in open education, it’s more of a tasting buffet of appetizers, designed to allow even the most time-constrained educators to participate.

What can I expect?

When you sign up for the series you complete a few questions about your knowledge of open education.  Each day you will receive an email with a link for the two daily challenges and a recap of the previous day’s challenges. It will be labelled OE Challenge Series, so be sure to make sure it doesn’t end up in your junk folder. All challenges and recaps will also be posted on this website. You will share your response to the challenges in the comments section of each challenge that will be moderated by the OE Challenge hosts.

Invite your colleagues to participate with you! It’s a great way to learn about OEP together!

Can I sign up even if I’m not new to open?

Yes, of course, but please try and bring along someone who is. This series is about generating more awareness about open education.

Register now!

Registration remains open throughout the series – join in on the fun anytime!

This event is free. To ensure we have an inclusive and welcoming environment for all, we’ve added registration to all our sessions.
Use an email that you commonly use, and make sure you check your junk folder. You may need to look in the junk folder occasionally during the series, as some institutional emails may flag it.

Your hosts for this series

Carolee Clyne

Josie Gray

Clint Lalonde

Krista Lambert

Melanie Meyers

Wicked Problems and Open Remedies: A Student-Centred Approach
Mar 1 @ 12:30 pm – 1:30 pm
Wicked Problems and Open Remedies: A Student-Centred Approach

This event is organized by the BC Open Education Librarians (BCOEL) group with sponsorship from BCcampus, Capilano University, Kwantlen Polytechnic University, Langara College, and the University of British Columbia (UBC) Okanagan campus.

Save the date! On March 1, please join us for this Open Education Week event to explore wicked problems and open remedies. A wicked problem is one that is difficult or impossible to solve due to incomplete, contradictory, interconnected, or changing factors. A problem that requires a major change in practice, belief, or behaviour for many people is often a wicked problem. Drawing on this idea, we turn our attention to the wicked problem in higher education of empowering students in the classroom and centring student voices in exploring the challenges of and potential solutions for this problem. Arley Cruthers (Kwantlen) will moderate the session. Student panelists include Kristen Morgan (UBC Okanagan), Sophia Nguyen (Simon Fraser University [SFU]), and Caitlin Spreeuw (Douglas College).  Open Education Week (March 1–5, 2021) is an annual global event that aims to “raise awareness and showcase the impact of open education on teaching and learning worldwide.”

Facilitator Info:

Arley Cruthers is a Paralympic medalist, novelist, and writing instructor. She won two World Championship gold medals and a bronze medal at the Athens 2004 Paralympic Games. She received accolades for both her novels, Post and The Time We All Went Marching, and she’s also the author of OER Business Writing for Everyone: An Inclusive Guide to Writing in the Workplace. She teaches applied communications at Kwantlen Polytechnic University, where she also currently serves as the Open Education Teaching Fellow. Arley is passionate about open education, open pedagogy, ungrading, Universal Design for Learning, and disability justice. She holds a master of fine arts from University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign.

Kristen Morgan is a physics and math student at UBC Okanagan, where she works in the library as the open education assistant and serves as a senator-at-large. She is passionate about the intersection of policy and advocacy, especially as they relate to sustainable long-term institutional changes. Kristen’s latest policy work addresses the prevalence of fee-based digital assessment tools (pay-to-play online homework systems) in the undergraduate student experience and reimagines assessment activities in an increasingly online environment. You can find Kristen on Twitter @KrisTheMorg.

Sophia Nguyen is a third-year business student at SFU who is passionate about creating positive community impact through entrepreneurship. She is a corporate relations coordinator for the SFU Student Marketing Association and an ambassador for Female Laboratory of Innovative Knowledge, a platform dedicated to helping women gain valuable work experience and enrich their professional networks. Sophia’s latest project is a children’s book called Jordan and the Magic Cape, created in collaboration at the Make Change Studio. This book is designed to educate children on the wicked problem of textile sustainability in a creative and impactful way.

Caitlin Spreeuw is a science student currently studying at Douglas College with hopes of transferring to SFU. She is the director of external relations at the Douglas Students’ Union, and through this role, she has had the opportunity to be a part of the Open Douglas working group. Caitlin is interested in open education because of its potential to save students a lot of money in the long run and help relieve the increasingly heavy financial burden of post-secondary education.

Open Education Week (March 1–5, 2021) is an annual, global event that aims to “raise awareness and showcase the impact of open education on teaching and learning worldwide.”

This event is free. To ensure we have an inclusive and welcoming environment for all, we’ve added registration to this event.

Register now!

This notice is to inform you that this session will be recorded, archived, and made available publicly on BCcampus.ca. By participating in this session, you acknowledge that your participation in this session will be recorded and the recording will be made available openly.

Mar
3
Wed
TRU: Getting Started: Finding, Using, and Adapting Open Resources
Mar 3 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm
TRU: Getting Started: Finding, Using, and Adapting Open Resources
The open education movement is based on faculty taking back control of the content delivered in the classroom. Faculty create resources based on their needs and then license them so that others can similarly use, reuse, or adapt them. Creating and using open educational resources (OER), whether big (such as open textbooks or open courses) or small (such as images, videos, or quiz questions), can significantly increase student learning and success.

There are millions of openly licensed resources available that can be used “as is” or be modified to better meet your own needs. Whether you’re looking for an open textbook to use or you’d like to use a number of resources to align with your course’s learning outcomes, this session will equip you with tips and best practices on how to find and evaluate existing OER, an overview of Creative Commons licences, suggestions on things to consider when reusing or modifying OER for your classes, and information about what help is available at TRU to support you in integrating OER into your teaching.

Related LibGuide:
Open Education Resources (OERs) by Brenda Smith
Mar
4
Thu
Open in the North: A Showcase of Open Educational Practices in Northern B.C.
Mar 4 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm
Open in the North: A Showcase of Open Educational Practices in Northern B.C.

The four post-secondary institutions in Northern B.C. — Coast Mountain College, College of New Caledonia, Northern Lights College, and University of Northern British Columbia — have active projects to help grow open educational practices in the region. Join this online event to learn more about the open educational practices being developed in these B.C. institutions.

Amanda Coolidge, Director of Open Education at BCcampus, will deliver the keynote address to start the session and introduce the concept of open educational practices. Presenters from each institution are invited to speak about how their projects, described below, support this idea.

Institutional Sustainability Grant 2020 

Coast Mountain College is developing a cohort of trades faculty to learn about and explore open educational resources (OER) and how they can adopt and adapt resources to meet their students’ needs. The idea was kicked off with a successful trades OER day. Coast Mountain College has also introduced an incentive program through its library. The college’s energy is focused on enabling a strong uptake in OER. Tracey Woodburn is the lead on this project.

Research Fellow 2020–2021  

Gripping the Paddle with Both Hands: Embedding Indigenous Learning Approaches into Online Education 

Rob-Roy Douglas from Northern Lights College is looking at how Indigenous experiential and narrative learning can be integrated into the online education environment to improve student engagement and outcomes.

Effectively Moving Away from Traditional Proctored Exams in First-Year Physics Courses 

At the University of Northern British Columbia, Meghan Costello is researching how we can effectively move away from traditional proctored midterm and final exams in first-year physics courses to improve student motivation and understanding of the course material.

Time Investment Grants 2021 North 

Scott van Dyk and Annette Sorensen, both Business instructors at Coast Mountain College, were awarded the BCcampus Time Investment Grant to co-develop open materials that provide Indigenous content relevant to Business Law and Ethics courses. These materials will enable instructors to have the resources to incorporate appropriate Indigenous content and develop new resources as needed.

Melissa Fournier, Work Integrated Learning Coordinator at College of New Caledonia, will oversee the development of student work-readiness OER and look at how this material can be integrated to enable broad use. This work will support students in preparing for experiential learning opportunities through innovative approaches.

This event is free. To ensure we have an inclusive and welcoming environment for all, we’ve added registration to our online office sessions.

Register now!

This notice is to inform you that this session will be recorded, archived, and made available publicly on BCcampus.ca. By participating in this session, you acknowledge that your participation in this session will be recorded and the recording will be made available openly.

 

Pulling Together Series: A Guide for Front-Line Staff, Student Services, and Advisors
Mar 4 @ 12:00 pm – Apr 8 @ 2:00 pm
Pulling Together Series: A Guide for Front-Line Staff, Student Services, and Advisors

Grab your paddle and join us in our canoe. In this six-week series, Marlene Erickson and Jewell Gillies will provide an overview of the BCcampus Pulling Together: A Guide for Front-Line Staff, Student Services, and Advisors resource, which reflects a holistic way for post-secondary workers to serve Indigenous students.

Many Indigenous students are first-generation learners at post-secondary institutions, and their interactions with front-line staff and service providers inform how they share their experience with their family and community. One negative experience can create harm and mistrust. Positive experiences help Indigenous students feel respected and build trust with staff and faculty. This can lead to future generations wanting to further their post-secondary education. The Pulling Together series is an opportunity for you to better understand Indigenous students and figure out how both you and your area or department can work to ensure supportive student experiences. By pulling together, we can facilitate student success and contribute to long-term improvements for Indigenous students and communities.

Series Overview 

This series requires a commitment of three hours of asynchronous study and self-reflection, along with one 90-minute synchronous session every Thursday for six weeks. We strongly advise participants to make time to attend every session in the series. Session dates and times are as follows:

  • Week 1: March 4 (12–2 p.m. PT)
  • Week 2: March 11 (12–2 p.m. PT)
  • Week 3: March 18 (12–2 p.m. PT)
  • Week 4: March 25 (12–2 p.m. PT)
  • Week 5: April 1 (12–2 p.m. PT)
  • Week 6: April 8 (12–2 p.m. PT)

We will cap registrations at 50 participants, so please ensure you register early to attend the entire series.

The series will be facilitated using a variety of methods. We will host guest speakers that include an Elder, a student panel, and a keynote. Participants will collaborate with one another in weekly breakout rooms. Each participant will be mailed their own medicine pouch kit and instructed how to assemble it during one of the synchronous sessions. This communal activity is a unique aspect of the series and provides a way for participants to hold space for themselves and their own self-care during the workshop. We will also be joined by graphic recorder Michelle Buchholz, who will capture the essence of each session with a succinct visual image that will be shared with participants. Graphic recording is a modern take on the witnessing ceremony, and we are honored to have Michelle with us to witness this community work.

Themes to guide the conversation will follow the qualities and journeys of four animals important to Indigenous culture in B.C.:

  • Chetwood (the Bear) — Intentions and values. How did you get to be here today?
  • Kahkah (the Raven) — The determination to paddle. We will look at what you need to do to be successful in your journey.
  • Leloo (the Wolf) — The one who gathers the community. This theme speaks to participants’ willingness to be on this journey and make changes.
  • Sammon (the Salmon) — The wealth you take home from your journey.

By no means will you be an expert on Indigenous history, culture, or reconciliation after participating in this series, but the facilitators reassure us that no one currently is or can be. For one thing, too many different Indigenous groups and diverse representations of Indigenous peoples exist across our province and country. Additionally, Jewell says the work of creating equity for any equity-seeking group is always in progress. In reality, we will never be finished, so this is why we focus on the journey. A saying in traditional paddle communities is: “It’s the journey, not the destination.” This holds true for all work done in the anti-oppression arena. We look forward to the journey ahead with each of you.

Facilitators

Marlene Erickson grew up in Nak’azdli (also known as Fort St. James). She is the executive director of Aboriginal education at College of New Caledonia, where she has worked for over 25 years in various roles. She has served as director for the Yinka Dene Language Institute and as a director, advisor, and chairperson for the First Peoples’ Cultural Council. She is an executive board member of the First Nations Education Steering Committee, a policy and advocacy organization that represents and works on behalf of First Nations communities in B.C. Marlene also chairs the BC Aboriginal Coordinators Council. With her strong interest in oral history, Marlene has been a long-time advocate for language and cultural revitalization.

Jewell Gillies is Musgamagw Dzawada’enuxw of the Kwakwaka’wakw Nation (northern Vancouver Island). After completing two years of study toward a criminal justice diploma at University of the Fraser Valley, Jewell spent time as a police officer in Vancouver. However, after six years in law enforcement, Jewell had to accept that the uniform was a barrier to the goals they wanted to achieve, as it represented a disturbing history for the individuals Jewell was trying to connect to and help. Jewell switched gears and began working in the educational system. Now, in their work in the Aboriginal Services Department of Okanagan College, Jewell is recognizing that they are in a better position to effect real change. They are also responsible for creating the Positive Space Committee for LGBTQ2+ students and staff at Okanagan College.

Please register ASAP. If you have further questions, please contact Gabrielle Lamontagne at glamontagne@bccampus.ca.

This event is free. To ensure we have an inclusive and welcoming environment for all, we’ve added registration to all our events.

Register now!

This notice is to inform you that this session will be recorded, archived, and made available publicly on BCcampus.ca. By participating in this session, you acknowledge that your participation in this session will be recorded and the recording will be made available openly.

 

Mar
12
Fri
FLO Friday: Creating Inclusive Spaces Online – Considering the “Other”
Mar 12 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

Come and participate in an interactive session in which we will unpack the importance of fostering spaces that champion both vulnerability and empathy with your students.
This FLO Friday session will model how to use online apparatus to facilitate discussions about contemporary topics that consider society, culture, bias, and justice through the lens of your students’ experiences.

Your FLO facilitator for the session will be Olaolu Adeleye. Olaolu Adeleye has a passion for social development issues seen through the application of an intercultural lens informed by his studies in international development and experiences with various global organizations. These include the Canadian Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, Right To Play, the United Nations Office for Disaster Reduction (UNDRR), and UNICEF Peru. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in International Development from Dalhousie University (2008) and a Master of Science in Poverty Reduction: Policy and Practice from the University of London, School of Oriental and African Studies (2013). As an associate faculty member at Royal Roads University, Olaolu Adeleye translates this international experience into engaging approaches that reframe contemporary global issues.

This event is free. To ensure we have an inclusive and welcoming environment for all, we’ve added registration to our online office sessions.

Register now!

This notice is to inform you that this session will be recorded, archived, and made available publicly on BCcampus.ca. By participating in this session, you acknowledge that your participation in this session will be recorded and the recording will be made available openly.

Apr
5
Mon
BCcampus Book Club: Small Teaching Online
Apr 5 @ 11:00 am – Jun 8 @ 12:00 pm
BCcampus Book Club: Small Teaching Online

Following up on the success of our 2019 offering centred around Small Teaching by James Lang, we will be diving into Small Teaching Online by Flower Darby.

Are you still feeling unsure about your skills as an online facilitator of learning? This selection for our online book club might be just the confidence booster you need! Join the discussion and exploration of strategies and tools to hone your online-facilitation skills. The book club will be facilitated over nine weeks, mostly asynchronously, with three optional synchronous sessions.

The synchronous sessions will be held on April 6, May 18, and June 8, 2021, at 11:00 a.m. PT.

This event is free. To ensure we have an inclusive and welcoming environment for all, we’ve added registration to our online office sessions.

Register now!

This notice is to inform you that this session will be recorded, archived, and made available publicly on BCcampus.ca. By participating in this session, you acknowledge that your participation in this session will be recorded and the recording will be made available openly.

Apr
27
Tue
Cascadia Open Education Summit 2021
Apr 27 – Apr 29 all-day
Cascadia Open Education Summit 2021

The Cascadia Open Education Summit is a unique three-day, internationally attended event where thought leaders come together to share groundbreaking ideas, research, and best practices for using open educational resources (OER). Our delegates include government officials, faculty, academic administrators and leaders, educational developers and technologists, librarians, instructional designers, student support staff, and students.

Register now!

To learn more about this event, head over to cascadia.bccampus.ca or sign up for the BCcampus newsletter.