Jan
21
Fri
Fun FLO Friday: Ice Breakers!
Jan 21 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm
Fun FLO Friday: Ice Breakers!

Beat the winter blahs with this fun one-hour session on icebreakers. An icebreaker is an activity or game designed to welcome attendees and warm up the conversation among participants in a meeting, classroom setting, team-building session, or other activity. Any event that requires people to comfortably interact with each other is an opportunity for an icebreaker. We’ll focus on the post-secondary classroom setting, both online and face to face. We’ll introduce you to a few “low-risk” icebreakers and provide an opportunity for participants to share some of their favourite tried-and-tested icebreakers with peers. Your fun FLO facilitators for this session will be our own Helena Prins and Olaolu Adeleye.

This event is free. To ensure we have an inclusive and welcoming environment for all, we’ve added registration to all our sessions.

Register now!

This notice is to inform you that this session will be recorded, archived, and made available publicly on BCcampus.ca. By participating in this session, you acknowledge that your participation in this session will be recorded and the recording will be made available openly.

Jan
24
Mon
Trauma-Informed Facilitation
Jan 24 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm
Trauma-Informed Facilitation
When we are facilitating sessions on difficult material, we often don’t know the stories of our participants. This means it’s important to bring a trauma-informed lens to our work. In this session we will learn about what trauma is, the impact it can have, and practical tools, tips, and strategies for trauma-informed facilitation.
This session is offered as part of a series of webinars focused on student wellness in partnership with the Ministry of Advanced Education and Skills Training. In particular, this session will focus on supporting facilitators who may want to adopt some of the wellness and support training recently released by BCcampus on topics such as prevention of and response to sexualized violence and mental health and wellness.

 

Facilitator:

Dawn Schell (she/her) is the manager of mental-health outreach and training at the University of Victoria. She has facilitated over 300 mental-health literacy sessions for staff and faculty over the past seven years. Recently Dawn has been focused on re-entry anxiety and its impact on students, staff, and faculty.

This event is free. To ensure we have an inclusive and welcoming environment for all, we’ve added registration to all our sessions.

Register now! 

This notice is to inform you that this session will be recorded, archived, and made available publicly on BCcampus.ca. By participating in this session, you acknowledge that your participation in this session will be recorded and the recording will be made available openly.

Jan
27
Thu
Moving from Men as Allies to Men as Stakeholders
Jan 27 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Moving from Men as Allies to Men as Stakeholders
This session is offered as part of a series of webinars focused on student wellness in partnership with the Ministry of Advanced Education and Skills Training.

For the past 70+ years, we’ve had a tremendous conversation about women’s roles and identities in society and have made a lot of progress. However, we’ve been missing a parallel conversation for, with, and about men (let alone beyond the binary), which is hampering our ability to achieve equality among genders. How do we answer the question “What’s in it for me?” when we engage men and boys around gender and masculinity? Join to learn about how we can unpack these conversations in our circles, communities, and culture.

Facilitator:

As executive director of Next Gen Men, Jake Stika (he/him) is a passionate speaker and facilitator focused on gender-based issues related to the social and emotional development of young men, the health and well-being of men in communities, and gender equity in workplaces for a future where boys and men experience less pain and cause less harm. Jake was named one of Avenue Magazine’s Top 40 Under 40 and has been recognized by Ashoka, the British Council, and the Canadian Centre for Diversity and Inclusion. He has spoken at the United Nations as part of the Canadian delegation and participated in the UN Women Safe Cities and Safe Public Spaces Global Leaders’ Forum. He is also a proud advisor to the Calgary Immigrant Women’s Association, Canadian Women & Sport, and the Calgary Women’s Emergency Shelter.

This event is free. To ensure we have an inclusive and welcoming environment for all, we’ve added registration to all our sessions.

Register now! 

This notice is to inform you that this session will be recorded, archived, and made available publicly on BCcampus.ca. By participating in this session, you acknowledge that your participation in this session will be recorded and the recording will be made available openly.

Feb
2
Wed
Decolonizing Process: Lessons Learned
Feb 2 @ 9:30 am – 10:30 am

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada exposed the need for post-secondary institutions to take action on the ongoing impacts of colonialism on education and the inclusion of Indigenous worldviews in teaching and learning practices. As institutions embark on this work, it is vital they consider not only what changes need to be made but also how they will move forward to respond to Indigenization, decolonization, and the commitments in the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Calls to Action. In this session Vancouver Island University Child and Youth Care faculty will share lessons learned as they engaged in a process to co-create and articulate a decolonial approach to practice within the program. Join to gain insights about elements of the process that facilitated the creation of a collective vision for moving toward reconciliation.

Bios:

Manjeet Uppal (He/him)

Manjeet’s professional background includes nearly 20 years of working with Aboriginal and First Nations communities around services to children, youth, and families. Manjeet’s active involvement in many community projects includes the development of a street-worker program and drop-in centre for youth; an organizing role in community outreach programs, including suicide prevention and intervention committees; and committees to end domestic violence. He has also served on the advisory board of a family health centre/pregnancy-outreach program and the Victoria Family Court Committee. He is a social activist and is involved in many political and social causes. Manjeet joined the Vancouver Island University faculty of Child and Youth Care in 2007. He has taught in the Child and Youth Care program at University of Victoria and with the Aboriginal Child Welfare Training Project. Areas of specialty include child- and youth-care practice in Aboriginal and First Nations Communities, diversity and cross-cultural practice, statutory child welfare practice, youth criminal justice, youth-based practice, and community development.

Teri Derksen (She/her)

Teri has worked for over 20 years in the field of child and youth care, primarily with adolescents, as a front-line worker, program administrator, and community development worker in the non-profit sector and in municipal government. Teri has a passion for activity-based child- and youth-care work, which is grounded in the many poignant experiences she has had hiking, climbing, paddling, and just hanging around in nature with youth. Teri has also had the opportunity to work extensively with communities as both a community programmer and a community youth development worker for municipal social planning and recreation departments. Her interest in communities became a major focus for her graduate work, which culminated in her master’s thesis, titled Community-Level Interventions in Child and Youth Care Practice. Teri has been a national trainer for an international organization dedicated to cross-cultural and peace education, has facilitated life-skills workshops for youth, and has taught in recreation and child- and youth-care programs at the University of Victoria and Vancouver Island University. Teri brings her passion for communities and activity-based work to the classroom, where she strives to work with students to create a climate for learning through play, exploration, and active participation.

Stephen Javorski (He/him)

Stephen is a professor in the Child and Youth Care department at Vancouver Island University. He has over 20 years of experience working with youth and young adults as a facilitator, guide, program manager, and counsellor, offering educational and therapeutic programming in settings ranging from schools to challenge courses to multi-week canoe expeditions in Canada’s North. He has a master’s degree in transpersonal counselling psychology with a wilderness therapy specialization from Naropa University. He is currently completing his PhD in outdoor experiential education with a focus on outdoor behavioural healthcare at the University of New Hampshire. Stephen’s research interests include risk management and predictors of clinical change in outdoor behavioural healthcare programs and applications of adventure therapy/activity-based interventions in community settings. He is a research associate for the Outdoor Behavioural Healthcare Centre and the National Association of Therapeutic Schools and Programs, is a member of the Association for Experiential Education, and has served on the leadership council for the Therapeutic Adventure Professional Group.

This event is free. To ensure we have an inclusive and welcoming environment for all, we’ve added registration to all our sessions.

Register now!

This notice is to inform you that this session will be recorded, archived, and made available publicly on BCcampus.ca. By participating in this session, you acknowledge that your participation in this session will be recorded and the recording will be made available openly. 

Moving from Men as Allies to Men as Stakeholders
Feb 2 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Moving from Men as Allies to Men as Stakeholders
This session is offered as part of a series of webinars focused on student wellness in partnership with the Ministry of Advanced Education and Skills Training.

For the past 70+ years, we’ve had a tremendous conversation about women’s roles and identities in society and have made a lot of progress. However, we’ve been missing a parallel conversation for, with, and about men (let alone beyond the binary), which is hampering our ability to achieve equality among genders. How do we answer the question “What’s in it for me?” when we engage men and boys around gender and masculinity? Join to learn about how we can unpack these conversations in our circles, communities, and culture.

Facilitator:

As executive director of Next Gen Men, Jake Stika (he/him) is a passionate speaker and facilitator focused on gender-based issues related to the social and emotional development of young men, the health and well-being of men in communities, and gender equity in workplaces for a future where boys and men experience less pain and cause less harm. Jake was named one of Avenue Magazine’s Top 40 Under 40 and has been recognized by Ashoka, the British Council, and the Canadian Centre for Diversity and Inclusion. He has spoken at the United Nations as part of the Canadian delegation and participated in the UN Women Safe Cities and Safe Public Spaces Global Leaders’ Forum. He is also a proud advisor to the Calgary Immigrant Women’s Association, Canadian Women & Sport, and the Calgary Women’s Emergency Shelter.

This event is free. To ensure we have an inclusive and welcoming environment for all, we’ve added registration to all our sessions.

Register now! 

This notice is to inform you that this session will be recorded, archived, and made available publicly on BCcampus.ca. By participating in this session, you acknowledge that your participation in this session will be recorded and the recording will be made available openly.

Feb
3
Thu
Capacity to Connect: Training for Faculty and Staff
Feb 3 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm
Capacity to Connect: Training for Faculty and Staff

This session is offered as part of a series of webinars focused on student wellness in partnership with the Ministry of Advanced Education and Skills Training.

This two-hour training covers foundational mental health and wellness knowledge for post-secondary faculty and staff and ways to support students in distress. It incorporates a decolonized perspective and is guided by the following principles: accessible, adaptable, culturally located, evidence-informed, inclusive, and trauma-informed. Handouts include a wellness wheel self-assessment tool and information on supporting students in distress. Two weeks prior to this session, attendees will receive session information, handouts, and tasks to complete ahead of the training. 

One other offering:

Presenter information 

Matty Hillman, MA (CYC) is a child and youth care instructor at Selkirk College in the beautiful Kootenay region of B.C., the traditional territory of the Sinixt people. His research interests include sexual violence prevention and response on post-secondary campuses, healthy masculinities, and critical youth mentorship. As a muralist, he is especially interested in the intersection of youth work and public art, exploring the opportunity these complimentary practices create for empowerment, community building, and social justice advancements. Readers may contact Matty at mhillman@selkirk.ca and access his full bio at http://selkirk.ca/faculty/matthew-matty-hillman. 

Jewell Gillies is Musgmagw Dzawada’enuwx (Wolf Clan) of the Kwakwakawakw Nation. Jewell is a two–spirit Indigenous person who has them/them/their pronouns. Jewell is an anti-oppression facilitator who coversi topics that range from justice, equity, diversity, and inclusion; sexual violence prevention; and mental health and wellness to naturalizing Indigenous worldviews into higher education. Jewell’s work as a police constable for the City of Vancouver prior to working in the education sector provides them with a wealth of experience in trauma-informed care and supports for intersectional community members who identify within historically excluded community groups. 

This event is free. To ensure we have an inclusive and welcoming environment for all, we’ve added registration to all our sessions.

Register now!

This notice is to inform you that this session will be recorded, archived, and made available publicly on BCcampus.ca. By participating in this session, you acknowledge that your participation in this session will be recorded and the recording will be made available openly.

Feb
9
Wed
Capacity to Connect: Training for Faculty and Staff
Feb 9 @ 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Capacity to Connect: Training for Faculty and Staff

This session is offered as part of a series of webinars focused on student wellness in partnership with the Ministry of Advanced Education and Skills Training.

This two-hour training covers foundational mental health and wellness knowledge for post-secondary faculty and staff and ways to support students in distress. It incorporates a decolonized perspective and is guided by the following principles: accessible, adaptable, culturally located, evidence-informed, inclusive, and trauma-informed. Handouts include a wellness wheel self-assessment tool and information on supporting students in distress. Two weeks prior to this session, attendees will receive session information, handouts, and tasks to complete ahead of the training. 

Presenter information 

Matty Hillman, MA (CYC) is a child and youth care instructor at Selkirk College in the beautiful Kootenay region of B.C., the traditional territory of the Sinixt people. His research interests include sexual violence prevention and response on post-secondary campuses, healthy masculinities, and critical youth mentorship. As a muralist, he is especially interested in the intersection of youth work and public art, exploring the opportunity these complimentary practices create for empowerment, community building, and social justice advancements. Readers may contact Matty at mhillman@selkirk.ca and access his full bio at http://selkirk.ca/faculty/matthew-matty-hillman. 

Jewell Gillies is Musgmagw Dzawada’enuwx (Wolf Clan) of the Kwakwakawakw Nation. Jewell is a two–spirit Indigenous person who has them/them/their pronouns. Jewell is an anti-oppression facilitator who covers topics that range from justice, equity, diversity, and inclusion; sexual violence prevention; and mental health and wellness to naturalizing Indigenous worldviews into higher education. Jewell’s work as a police constable for the City of Vancouver prior to working in the education sector provides them with a wealth of experience in trauma-informed care and supports for intersectional community members who identify within historically excluded community groups. 

This event is free. To ensure we have an inclusive and welcoming environment for all, we’ve added registration to all our sessions.

Register now!

This notice is to inform you that this session will be recorded, archived, and made available publicly on BCcampus.ca. By participating in this session, you acknowledge that your participation in this session will be recorded and the recording will be made available openly.

Feb
16
Wed
Inclusion Training: Understanding Diversity and Inclusion for Safer Spaces for Queer, Trans, and Two-Spirit Team Members and Students
Feb 16 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm
Inclusion Training: Understanding Diversity and Inclusion for Safer Spaces for Queer, Trans, and Two-Spirit Team Members and Students

This session is offered as part of a series of webinars focused on student wellness in partnership with the Ministry of Advanced Education and Skills Training.

This workshop speaks specifically to where you and your institution, team, department, or organization and LGBTQ2SAI+ folks might intersect. This includes information and statistics on LGBTQ2SAI+ populations and case studies and scenarios customized to reflect practical instances in which you and your team may need to confront homophobia, transphobia, and biphobia. 

Facilitator: Rana Nu (she/her/hers), education and training specialist, Qmunity

Rana is a social activist for non-violent communication and human rights. Throughout her more than 12-year career in civil society empowerment, peacebuilding, and community engagement, she has tailored and conducted training for civil society empowerment and social cohesion. Through these programs, she has helped to bridge the gap between people from different political affiliations, ethnicities, and beliefs, and she has increased their ability to lead change and deal with the arising trauma and humanitarian crisis in the Middle East.

Can’t make this event date? Other options are available:

This event is free. To ensure we have an inclusive and welcoming environment for all, we’ve added registration to all our sessions.

Register now! 

This notice is to inform you that this session will be recorded, archived, and made available publicly on BCcampus.ca. By participating in this session, you acknowledge that your participation in this session will be recorded and the recording will be made available openly.

Feb
23
Wed
Technology-Facilitated Sexual Violence: What It Is and How To Help
Feb 23 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Technology-Facilitated Sexual Violence: What It Is and How To Help

Technology is increasingly used by abusers to perpetrate sexualized violence and abuse. However, individuals who work in traditional anti-sexual violence support positions may be unfamiliar with these forms of violence or not know how to support students being victimized in these ways. This workshop offers an introduction to the issue of technology-facilitated sexual violence (TFSV) and abuse. It will define what this term means and describe various forms of it. The presenters will cover forms of TFSV that occur in close relationships, such as between intimate partners or friends, and TFSV in broader social groups, such as attacks in digital classrooms or on social media by classmates, acquaintances, or strangers. Following a description of the issue, specific example situations, and discussion about the harms caused by TFSV, the workshop will share various resources related to supporting victim-survivors. This will include TFSV safety-planning considerations, links to organizations with practical information and tip sheets, and other helpful guidelines for people experiencing TFSV and those providing support to them.

Bios:

Suzie Dunn (she/her) is an assistant professor at Dalhousie’s Schulich School of Law and a PhD candidate at the University of Ottawa. Her research centres on the intersections of equality, technology, and the law, with a specific focus on technology-facilitated violence, deepfakes, and impersonation in digital spaces. She sits on the Women’s Legal Education and Action Fund’s Technology Facilitated Violence Project committee, is an associate member of the Centre for Law Technology and Society, and is a senior fellow with the Centre for International Governance Innovation. You can find her on Twitter @SuzieMDunn or on her website: www.suziedunn.com

Cynthia Khoo (she/her) is a Canadian technology and human rights lawyer and an associate at the Center on Privacy and Technology at Georgetown Law in Washington, D.C. She is also a research fellow at the Citizen Lab (Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, University of Toronto) and a member of the board of directors of the Open Privacy Research Society. Her work focuses on how the internet and emerging technologies impact historically marginalized groups, including issues such as platform liability for online abuse, algorithmic decision-making (in criminal, civil, and commercial contexts), and worker surveillance. Follow her on Twitter at @cyn_k or visit her website at www.tekhnoslaw.ca.

This event is free. To ensure we have an inclusive and welcoming environment for all, we’ve added registration to all our sessions.

Register now

This notice is to inform you that this session will be recorded, archived, and made available publicly on BCcampus.ca. By participating in this session, you acknowledge that your participation in this session will be recorded and the recording will be made available openly.

Mar
2
Wed
FLO Lab: Whole Body Learning
Mar 2 @ 9:00 am – 12:00 pm
FLO Lab: Whole Body Learning

In this three-hour experiential and collaborative workshop, let’s intentionally include our bodies in the learning space! In this session, we’ll explore different ways to use embodied and holistic learning (movement, the five senses, emotions, spirit). Whether you have tried these types of activities before or are intrigued to learn more, join us to explore, practice, and discover what’s in it for you and your students. From having small “aha” moments to adding a number of new activities to your facilitator’s toolbox, you’ll gain something from participating in this lab. This will be a great opportunity to test a somatic/whole body activity you might want to practice. We’ll build part of the agenda in an open-space style to enable you to try your ideas with a supportive group. Our aim is to create a comfortable space to not only learn together but also gain insights on how to foster more holistic ways of engaging and learning. We will all be trying something new, facilitators included! In this session, you will:

  • Explore different ways of creative engagement online.
  • Acquire new tools and activities to bring into your online classrooms.
  • Gain new insights about how holistic learning can support your students’ experience.

We’ll invite you to submit your creative ideas to our collaborative Padlet in advance of the session to help build part of the agenda. This three-hour session will include two ten-minute breaks.

Facilitators:

Valeria Cortes (she/her) has extensive experience working with post-secondary institutions and community organizations across cultures. Through course design and facilitation, she encourages people to learn from one another and take action to enhance their organizations and communities. As an associate faculty member at Royal Roads University, Val teaches online, blended, and face-to-face courses.

Beth Cougler Blom (she/her) is a facilitator and learning designer who works with clients across all sectors through her business, Beth Cougler Blom Facilitation. She has been very involved in the Facilitating Learning Online (FLO) courses through BCcampus and Royal Roads University for many years. Beth is the author of Design to Engage: How to Create and Facilitate a Great Learning Experience for Any Group. Connect with Beth at bethcouglerblom.com.

Visit our Meet the FLO Facilitators page to learn more about Valeria and Beth!

This event has a non-refundable $25 registration fee.

Register now!

This notice is to inform you that this session will be recorded, archived, and made available publicly on BCcampus.ca. By participating in this session, you acknowledge that your participation in this session will be recorded and the recording will be made available openly.