Trades Summit Series: Strengthening Teaching and Learning for the Future

When:
November 24, 2022 – November 25, 2022 all-day
2022-11-24T00:00:00-08:00
2022-11-26T00:00:00-08:00

This event is designed to bring together trades faculty and those who support them for the purpose of examining the question, “How do we strengthen digital teaching and learning in vocational education for the next generation of learners?”

By attending this summit, you will hear from other trades faculty and leaders, have an opportunity to connect and network with faculty from across the country, hear how others have adapted to different delivery methods, and participate in important conversations about teaching and learning for trades.

Register now

The summit theme is based on a research project that will act as the framework for presentations, inquiry, and dialogue. The two summit days will start with a keynote address and consist of panel discussions, appreciative inquiry sessions, and presentations. On Thursday evening, in-person participants will be invited to “Pints and Pedagogy” at a local establishment near the event venue.

The summit will be conducted in a hybrid format where registrants will have the opportunity to participate in-person or virtually. The in-person summit will be held in the BCIT Downtown Campus with catering provided.


Schedule

Please note this schedule may change slightly.

Day 1 – November 24, 2022

Speakers: Clint Lalonde, Tim Carson

With the sudden and abrupt shift that brought Trades, Vocational, Education & Training into a form of emergency distance education, there can be no dispute that this change has brought with it some challenges. It has also brought about innovation and creativity. Trades education has been permanently changed and will not be going back to “normal.” The results of this study: Strengthening Digital Teaching and Learning for Trades, Vocational, Education and Training (TVET) Practitioners has shown there is a broad range of skills, ideologies, and methods for using digital tools in TVET education.Prior to the COVID-19 crisis, professional development opportunities for TVET practitioners had begun to focus on the integration of technology and open education pedagogy and resources into teaching and learning practices (Cronin, 2017, p. 18). It is safe to say that the global pandemic accelerated this process. Many TVET instructors found themselves having to learn and use digital tools overnight in March 2020. The primary purpose of this study was to examine instructors’ perceptions related to digital teaching and learning within TVET with the aim to identify existing strengths, acknowledge barriers, and to propose a path forward. Our hope is that the findings and recommendations from this study will support the future direction of professional development for TVET instructors, and ultimately improve student learning outcomes, and learning experiences.

Our intention was to capture TVET instructors’ perceptions while emergency remote delivery practices were still in place in the Province of British Columbia, Canada during the coronavirus global pandemic. The study revealed three overarching themes to strengthen digital learning and teaching in TVET: Digital Pedagogy, Technology and Tools, and Open Educational Resources and Open Pedagogy.

The global pandemic has disrupted trades education and the inclusion of digital pedagogy offers educators the opportunity to permanently embrace these approaches. Trades and Vocational instructors currently work in a spectrum of low-tech to high-tech, and low-pedagogy (teacher-centered) to high-pedagogy (learner-centered). The findings of this study provide a roadmap for a deeper conversation regarding the digitization of Trades and Vocational Education and Training. The introduction of digital pedagogy during the pandemic crumbled many silos and offered opportunities for educators, institutes, and industries to collaborate and innovate (Bates, 2015). The bones of TVET are structurally sound, yet we found the pedagogical approaches to be in need of renovation (Lucas et al., 2012). Digital pedagogy, in collaboration with open educational resources, offers the tools for such a re-envisioning. Collectively, the inclusion of digital pedagogies and resources can help create a stronger, more creative, innovative, and pedagogically sound system appropriate for the ever-changing demands of the 21st century.

References

Bates, A. W. (2015). Teaching in a digital age: Guidelines for designing teaching and learning. Tony Bates Associates.
Cronin, C. (2017). Openness and praxis: Exploring the use of open educational practices in higher education. International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning, 18(5), 15–34.

Lucas, B., Spencer, E., & Claxton, G. (2012, December). How to teach vocational education: A theory of vocational pedagogy. City & Guilds Centre for Skills Development. https://doi.org/10.13140/2.1.3424.5928

Speaker: Sally Vinden

Dr. Sally Vinden was the recipient of the 2020 BCcampus Award for Excellence in Open Education, and the 2019 Provost Award for Teaching Design and Practice that Employs Innovative Practices for Student Learning, Vancouver Island University (VIU), and the Dean’s Award for Scholarship, Research and Creative Activity 2021.

Sally holds a Doctor of Philosophy Degree in Curriculum and Implementation Theory from Simon Fraser University (SFU), a Master of Educational Leadership, as well as a Red Seal Endorsement and City & Guilds credential in the Trade of Hairstylist.

Sally’s educational journey has been far from traditional. At the age of 16 she began her career as an apprentice hairdresser in London, England, where she excelled in the industry. She has since immigrated to the west coast of Canada where she gradually transitioned from hairstylist to educator. Following the completion of her Doctorate in early 2020, Sally held the position of TVET specific Curriculum, Teaching & Learning Specialist at VIU. Today she is Acting Associate Dean with VIU’s Faculty of Trades & Applied Technology. She has been an advocate for the development and harmonization of trades in Canada, Trinidad & Tobago (C-EFE), and Kenya (KEFEP). Her unique educational journey from ‘tradesperson to academic’ disrupts traditional thinking related to the academic/vocational divide. Sally believes the stigma attached to trades is misplaced and no longer serves a purpose in the 21st Century. This belief is reflected in her work and her passion for the enhancement of TVET and is evident in her doctoral research entitled An exploration of British Columbia’s TVET Instructors’ perceptions that influence their curriculum choices.

There were many lessons learned during the COVID-19 lockdown, including that we could move learning online – even in the Trades! Join Michelle and Mabyn as they explore how they used an early faculty tech adopter as a catalyst to move a team of Trades instructors forward during shifting understandings of “what” instructors can do. We will share some of our favorite digital tools and how they helped online/ blended trades students feel supported and part of a community of learners. We will also share some of the flops and reflect on why they didn’t stick. Lastly, many of the tools and course design tweaks that resulted because of the pandemic have fundamentally shifted F2F program delivery this fall. We will unpack some of these enduring pandemic lessons and explore how they are informing our practice moving forward.

Speakers: Mabyn Grinde, Michelle Beal

Mabyn Grinde is the Faculty Development Coordinator at Lakeland College, AB. She is passionate about all things teaching and learning and loves supporting faculty to explore and grow in their teaching craft!

Michelle Beal has been a Hairstyling/ Barber Instructor at Lakeland College, AB for the past 5 years. She loves teaching and learning and is always tweaking, rebuilding, and trying out new tools and approaches in support of student learning.

15 minute break.

Using online lectures during the pandemic resulted in a decrease in TVET student engagement. Prerecorded lectures posted to YouTube (asynchronous delivery) along with an online learning game called Kahoot (synchronous delivery) were used to engage students and resulted in an increase in engagement and learning.

Speaker: Joshua Hill

Joshua Hill is an instructor in the Electrical Apprenticeship Program at the Lethbridge College. He has also taught at Vancouver Career College and Sprott Shaw College in similar programs. His love for learning and pedagogical development runs deep. He is a MA graduate with a degree in Psychology.

While many instructors and instructional designers are familiar with different technologies that can be used in the classroom, it can be difficult to know when to use which technology. This session will offer direction on ways to make informed decisions to integrate technology to impact student learning “not simply digitize what we’ve always done” (Graham et al. 2019). Three instructional design models will be presented in relation to TVET sector instruction to support teachers, instructional designers, and curriculum designers to understand best practices in technology integration with intention. These frameworks will inform participants on which affordances best lend themselves to certain modalities. Examples of courses, based on backwards design using instructional design frameworks, will be shared. Overall, this session will support participants with innovative wisdom to develop or instruct a transformative educational course for a variety of learners in multiple TVET settings. Participants will be involved by completing live polls, interaction on jamboards, as well as in decisions to develop new educational opportunities based on frameworks discussed for their specific TVET realms.

Speakers: Camellia Hill, Jessica DeMolder

Camellia Hill is an innovative educator with over a decade of educational involvement. She has been employed as a teacher in the Ukraine, Canada, the Dominican Republic, Brazil, and now the United States of America. Camellia has a combined degree in Kinesiology and Education from the University of Lethbridge, as well as a master’s degree in Portuguese Pedagogy from Brigham Young University. She is presently a graduate student in Instructional Psychology and Technology at Brigham Young University (BYU). Camellia has designed courses as an Instructional Designer. She is presently a teacher of Technology Integration at BYU.

Jessica DeMolder is a doctoral candidate at Brigham Young University who studies instructional psychology and technology with a focus on technology integration in language learning environment. She has been adjunct faculty teaching language as well as language methodologies for over a decade. She also is the language curriculum manager at the language training center at the University.

One hour lunch break.

In this session we’ll discuss how we’ve been utilizing the technology in our new Makerspace, in collaboration with the Centre for Trades, to create accessible, engaging open educational resources.

Speakers: Darel Bennedbaek, Jessie Sorensen

Darel Bennedbaek has worked in academic libraries since 2012. In 2019, he started as systems librarian, then moved into the role of library coordinator in 2021. Darel enjoys leveraging library resources to make space for innovative projects that empower faculty, staff, and students.

Jessie Sorensen has worked in both academic and public libraries since 2016. They started in the Buchanan Library in 2021. In 2022, they researched and lead the creation of the Centre for Teaching, Learning, and Innovation’s Makerspace. Jessie enjoys the vast breadth of creative projects available in collaborating with college departments.

In many vocational education settings the theoretical knowledge and the practical application are commonly viewed as two important, but separate aspects of the students learning. This session promotes opportunities to create authentic learning experiences through exploring the shop environment as a medium to reinforce and even introduce theoretical learning.

Speaker: Ryan Buhler

Ryan Buhler is a Curriculum and Instructional Specialist for the Northern Alberta Institute of Technology (NAIT). He is an experienced Steamfitter and Welder journey person and educator who has a passionate curiosity about how students are learning in vocational/trades education. His curiosity about student engagement led him to his Master’s in Education through the University of Alberta. Non-professional interests include passions for many nerdy avenues such as Star Wars, Lord of the Rings and Horror in general. He has three tiny humans, two ridiculous dogs and a loving partner.

Speaker: Tim Carson

Day 2 – November 25, 2022

Speaker: Tim Carson

Trades education lends itself nicely to the philosophy of open educational resources (OER) and open educational practices (OEP) and Educational technology (Edtech). This presentation will discuss the current state of vocational education (from a Canadian context), how OER and OEP can benefit vocational education (cost savings as well as pedagogical benefits), and present methods being employed in my own practice that are seeing beneficial results. The presentation will have “check-in” points along the way using the interactive plugin for google slides, pear deck. Not only will this allow for interaction between the presenter and the audience but it is an example of some of the technology that I am using in vocational education.

Speaker: Chad Flinn

Chad Flinn (he/him) is the dean of the School of Trades & Technology at Medicine Hat College. Prior to this role, he was a learning technology trainer at Saskatchewan Polytechnic and has 11 years of experience as an electrical instructor at the British Columbia Institute of Technology (BCIT). Before entering education, Chad worked in the private sector as an operational manager of an electrical/instrumentation contracting firm in Fort McMurray. He has a strong interest in research and trades vocational education and training (TVET). His master’s thesis focused on the experience of trade students in the use and co-creation of open educational resources.  Most recently, he co-authored a paper on strengthening digital teaching and learning pedagogies for TVET practitioners. Chad is researching the use of the bichronous model for teaching trades in a blended format.
Chad recently began his journey toward a doctorate in education with a focus on higher education leadership at Western University. He holds a master of arts (learning and technology) from Royal Roads University and a provincial instructor diploma from Vancouver Career College. He’s also a Red Seal journeyman electrician, having completed apprenticeship training at BCIT.

Coast Mountain College had a dream: To develop a program that would immerse learners in traditional harvesting and processing methods practiced by First Nations communities in the Northwest; focusing on food source-to-table, emphasizing the importance of a sustainable food system. Do you have a dream for your program? Learn from our experience!

Speakers: Kelly Swain, Darlene Godfrey

Kelly Swain is Associate Dean of Trades and First Nations Fine Arts at Coast Mountain College in Terrace. Her passion for community engagement and growth has inspired her career in the post-secondary education sector, particularly in trades training and community-based programming. Kelly holds a Bachelor of Arts in International Relations from Okanagan University College and is currently engaged in a Masters of Arts in Interdisciplinary Studies from Athabasca University. She is also the Chair of the Indigenization sub-committee for BCATTA.

Darlene Godfrey began to work for Coast Mountain College as support in the Cafeteria in 2006. Two years later she was teaching in the Culinary Arts program. “I encourage students to succeed by emphasizing that they must be committed to the program and attend every day. I use, ‘Discipline always beats waiting for Motivation!’ to emphasize the importance of being committed to the work.” She is a Red Seal Chef and has also gained a PIDP Certificate from VCC for adult education. Darlene adores the northwest, a part of the world that is so incredibly beautiful. “I enjoy all it has to offer.” Darlene is also an avid fly fisher who ties all of her own flies. She especially enjoys the relaxing nature of the hobby.

15 minute break.

Lethbridge College is collaborating with K-12 STEM teachers to develop OERs (videos, lesson activities, toolkits, classroom kits, 3D printable files, and more) that draw attention to the many examples of mathematics and science in the Trades. The process of collaboration among teachers, faculty, instructional designers and media specialists has resulted in several secondary benefits that will impact teaching and learning in both K-12 and post-secondary environments.

Speakers: Brianne Hutchinson, Warren Anderson

Brianne Hutchinson is a Learning Experience Designer, Center for Teaching, Learning and Innovation at the Lethbridge College.

Post pandemic we have seen an ever-increasing usage of Learning Management Systems (LMS) as both repositories of knowledge and student assignments/activities in vocational education settings. This session looks at ways to integrate asynchronous activities to better prepare students for the face-to-face shop/lab settings.

Speaker: Ryan Buhler

Ryan Buhler is a Curriculum and Instructional Specialist for the Northern Alberta Institute of Technology (NAIT). He is an experienced Steamfitter and Welder journey person and educator who has a passionate curiosity about how students are learning in vocational/trades education. His curiosity about student engagement led him to his Master’s in Education through the University of Alberta. Non-professional interests include passions for many nerdy avenues such as Star Wars, Lord of the Rings and Horror in general. He has three tiny humans, two ridiculous dogs and a loving partner.

One hour lunch break.

This session will highlight processes of instructional designers (ID) and subject matter experts (SME) in determining design decisions for TVET courses. Participants will be involved in an authentic practice of conversations between ID and SME to determine what course content to include online, blended or bichronous; and what course content to include synchronous or asynchronous. Decisions will model influence of technology integration frameworks, affordances frameworks, as well as the three types of online interactions. Participants will be involved in developing individual course content based on specific course outcomes with added direction from practiced frameworks in the session’s discussion. Participants involvement will include: jamboards, live polls, and course designs based on their individual course outcomes or realms of responsibility. Institutions will lead with additional technology tools to integrate into present LMS systems to increase learner interactivity online.

Speakers: Camellia Hill, Joshua Hill

Camellia Hill is an innovative educator with over a decade of educational involvement. She has been employed as a teacher in the Ukraine, Canada, the Dominican Republic, Brazil, and now the United States of America. Camellia has a combined degree in Kinesiology and Education from the University of Lethbridge, as well as a master’s degree in Portuguese Pedagogy from Brigham Young University. She is presently a graduate student in Instructional Psychology and Technology at Brigham Young University (BYU). Camellia has designed courses as an Instructional Designer. She is presently a teacher of Technology Integration at BYU.

Joshua Hill is an instructor in the Electrical Apprenticeship Program at the Lethbridge College. He has also taught at Vancouver Career College and Sprott Shaw College in similar programs. His love for learning and pedagogical development runs deep. He is a MA graduate with a degree in Psychology.

Speaker: Tim Carson

Register now


Registration Close Dates

  • In-person registration closes November 21, 2022
  • Virtual registration closes November 23, 2022

Registration Fee

  • In-person registration fee: $50.00 +GST (includes a light breakfast, lunch, and break refreshments on both days)
  • Virtual registration fee: $35.00 +GST

IN-PERSON EVENT

In-person Venue Location

We will host the in-person attendees at the BCIT Downtown Campus in a boardroom (2nd Floor, Room 230). Pay parking is available below the campus at 555 Seymour Street. You can find more information on parking and rates here BCIT Parking.

Connecting with Peers

During the event, both in-person and virtual attendees can connect with each other through our community Slack backchannel during the event.

See you there!

Join our Slack channel: Tradessummitseries.slack.com

Social Event

We hope you will join us for a no-host, “Pints and Pedagogy” casual meetup at the end of the first day, on November 24, 2022. We will be meeting at Malone’s Taphouse, 608 W. Pender St., Vancouver, B.C. (corner of Seymour and Pender).

Hotel Recommendations

If you are traveling to the event from out of town, we recommend several hotels in the downtown area: Skwachàys Lodge, Metropolitan Hotel Vancouver, and St. Regis Hotel.

COVID-19 Information

We acknowledge and respect that everyone has their own comfort levels regarding the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. Although province-wide event restrictions have been lifted, we encourage everyone to do what feels right for them, including wearing masks or physical distancing if desired. Please be mindful that your fellow guests may not be ready for handshakes. Always ask first.

VIRTUAL EVENT

Virtual Attendance

The virtual event will be delivered through Zoom. Login information will be provided closer to the event day.

If you are attending virtually, you can expect to participate in breakout rooms, polling, and engaging with in-person attendees by having your camera on/camera off as well as using our chat features through Zoom and our Slack channel.

Connecting with Peers

During the event, both in-person and virtual attendees can connect with each other through our community Slack backchannel during the event.

See you there!

Join our Slack channel: Tradessummitseries.slack.com


Contact Info

For any questions or concerns about the event, please contact events@bccampus.ca.